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October 7, 2016
Briefs

NCI Adopts Roadmap to Achieve Moonshot Goals

National Cancer Institute acting director Dr. Douglas Lowy recently accepted the recommendations of a blue ribbon panel on 10 recommendations most likely to make a decade’s worth of progress against cancer in 5 years, a key goal of the White House Cancer Moonshot.

The report was presented by the panel and approved by the National Cancer Advisory Board. With this roadmap in hand, NCI plans to move forward in investing in these areas of research.

In addition to the 10 scientific recommendations, the roadmap has additional specific, special projects. These include a demonstration project to test for Lynch syndrome, a heritable genetic condition that increases risk of several types of cancer, to improve early detection and prevention; establishment of a nationwide pediatric immunotherapy clinical trials network to enhance the speed with which new immunotherapies can be tested in children; exploring patient-derived organoids; and “microdosing” devices to test drug responses in living tumors.

Lowy will share these recommendations with the Cancer Moonshot task force.

“I am deeply indebted to the 28 outstanding individuals who have served on the blue ribbon panel and to the 150 working group members who put aside business as usual to contribute their years of expertise to this once-in-a-lifetime opportunity,” said Lowy. “NCI is also greatly appreciative of Vice President Biden’s leadership and passion for the Cancer Moonshot and for motivating all who have been working so hard to make it a reality.”

To view the 10 recommendations and read the full report, visit www.cancer.gov/BRP.

OD Celebrates ACEP Graduates

The NIH Office of the Director recently celebrated the second graduating class of the Administrative Career Enhancement Program (ACEP). Participants in this OD development program heard remarks from LaVerne Stringfield, associate director for management, OD, and a commencement address from Calvin Jackson, deputy associate director for communications and public liaison.

Jackson encouraged graduates to “stay in touch with your mentors, both formal and informal, network with your fellow ACEP classmates, ask for what you want and do something that will get you out of your comfort zone on a regular basis. That is one of the best ways to grow and learn. Also, remember that character counts.” Jackson concluded by reciting the poem If by Rudyard Kipling.

ACEP, an initiative of the OD Voice, was formed to address organizational awareness and professional development for OD employees. The OD Voice analyzes yearly Employee Viewpoint Survey data and makes recommendations to increase employee engagement, enhance morale and capitalize on areas in which the OD excels.

New ACEP graduates include (front, from l) Tanya Barnett, Alisha Washington, Avraham Gross, Toddchelle Young, Stephanie Jackson, Lynne Williams, Ileana Turner. At rear are (from l) Stephanie Bonhomme, Zina Abdelaziz, Kimberly White, Anne Smogur-Saldivar, Lakeisha Washington. Not shown are Woleola Akinso and Caviaunce Phillips.
New ACEP graduates include (front, from l) Tanya Barnett, Alisha Washington, Avraham Gross, Toddchelle Young, Stephanie Jackson, Lynne Williams, Ileana Turner. At rear are (from l) Stephanie Bonhomme, Zina Abdelaziz, Kimberly White, Anne Smogur-Saldivar, Lakeisha Washington. Not shown are Woleola Akinso and Caviaunce Phillips.

ACEP provides training and development to OD employees at the GS-12 level and below. Participants are nominated to the program by their supervisor.

ACEP is supported by Dr. Lawrence Tabak, NIH principal deputy director, and also strongly supported by OD leadership. As a result, the program continues to be offered at no cost to staff by utilizing the knowledge and expertise within OD.

“I am so thankful that I was accepted into the ACEP program,” said recent graduate Anna Smogur-Saldivar. “The thoughtfully crafted sessions were led by welcoming senior staff members who helped us polish our skills—from mediation to written and oral presentations. ACEP also afforded me the opportunity to interact with peers whom I might not normally meet within such a large IC. ACEP allowed us to see how we fit into the larger OD structure.”

OCT. 28
Community College Day Scheduled

The NIH Office of Intramural Training & Education will hold Community College Day 2016 on Friday, Oct. 28 from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. at the Natcher Conference Center. The event provides community college students and faculty an opportunity to visit the NIH campus and learn about careers and training opportunities in biomedical and health care fields. To register and for more information visit www.training.nih.gov.

FelCom’s International Expo, Oct. 20

The 10th International Opportunities Expo, sponsored by the visiting fellows subcommittee of the NIH fellows committee (FelCom), is scheduled for Thursday, Oct. 20 from noon to 4:30 p.m. in the NIH FAES Education Center, Bldg. 10. Postdoctoral fellows and graduate students interested in pursuing international science careers can meet with representatives from embassies, funding agencies and globally minded science and health organizations who will be on hand to promote their programs and resources.

Physician-Congressman Visits NIH

Rep. Michael Burgess (R-TX, l), a physician, tours the NIBIB Laboratory of Molecular Imaging and Nanomedicine in the Porter Neuroscience Research Center with NIBIB director Dr. Roderic Pettigrew (c) and lab chief Dr. Shawn Chen. Chen (r) shows Burgess an example of the Tyndall effect—in this instance, a column of light when nanoparticles suspended in liquid reflect the colored beam of a laser pointer. Dr. Fuwu Zhang looks on.

At left, Rep. Michael Burgess (R-TX, l), a physician, tours the NIBIB Laboratory of Molecular Imaging and Nanomedicine in the Porter Neuroscience Research Center with NIBIB director Dr. Roderic Pettigrew (c) and lab chief Dr. Shawn Chen. Chen’s lab develops new imaging probes for diagnosis and treatment monitoring as well as nanomedicine for drug and gene delivery. At right, Chen (r) shows Burgess an example of the Tyndall effect—in this instance, a column of light when nanoparticles suspended in liquid reflect the colored beam of a laser pointer. Dr. Fuwu Zhang looks on.

In the bottom photo, Dr. Sung-Youl Ko of the NIAID Vaccine Research Center demonstrates an assay used in Zika virus vaccine development for Burgess. Looking on are (from l) NIAID director Dr. Anthony Fauci, VRC director Dr. John Mascola and VRC deputy director Dr. Barney Graham, who provided the congressman with a tour of the VRC prior to the lab demo.
Dr. Sung-Youl Ko of the
PHOTOS: BILL BRANSON

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