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November 18, 2016
Milestones

Lindner Named Director of CSR Office

Dr. Mark Lindner

The Center for Scientific Review has named Dr. Mark Lindner as new director of its Office of Planning, Analysis and Evaluation. He has been working part-time in this office for the last 5½ years while serving as scientific review officer for several CSR study sections, including small business applications and, most recently, cognition and perception.

“I am very pleased that Mark will be stepping into this critical position,” said CSR director Dr. Richard Nakamura. “His scientific, analytic and statistical expertise is broad and deep. He also brings remarkable insight into current and needed research to evaluate and improve peer review.”

The Office of Planning, Analysis and Evaluation provides data, analysis and evaluations of the peer review of NIH grant applications for special projects, inquiries and advisory council activities.

Lindner received his Ph.D. in biopsychology from the University of Texas. After postdoctoral training, he spent 15 years managing and coordinating drug discovery research in industry at CytoTherapeutics in Lincoln, R.I.; Neurocrine Biosciences in San Diego; and Bristol-Myers Squibb in Wallingford, Conn. He also did consulting with McArthur and Associates GmbH, in Basel, Switzerland.

Lindner has published numerous papers that discuss how scientific research can be evaluated, conducted and managed to increase scientific productivity and the rate of progress. His interests range from the reductionist focus on molecular mechanisms to the psychology of the scientist and systemic and organizational factors that affect human judgment and decision-making.

NCIís Brosky Says Farewell

After 18 years at NIH, Keith Brosky, who joined the NCI Laboratory of Pathology in 1998 as a cytotechnologist, is hanging up his lab coat. Friends and co-workers helped celebrate the end of an era on Oct. 6.

Keith Brosky
Keith Brosky

“A truly vital part of the laboratory,” according to colleagues, Brosky was instrumental in developing new procedures, training residents and fellows and even collaborated with hospitals in Kenya to improve cytology services and access to patient care in that country. In addition, he co-authored numerous publications. Also, because of his direct patient contact, he has seen dramatic improvements in the patients who have been involved in cancer clinical trials over the years.

“I enjoyed working in the cytology laboratory with co-workers who have been like a family to me,” Brosky said. “There is a complete team effort, and technical and support staff are treated with respect and as equals to the staff physicians. The taco parties we had a few times each year were also a plus!”

Dr. Armando Filie, head of the cytopathology section, said, “Keith has a keen knowledge as a cytotechnologist and dedication and professionalism not only with regard to patient care but also in maintaining the lab. Of course, his dry and witty sense of humor could always make even the most stressful situations less tense. Keith has been a critical part of the cytopathology section.”

Brosky took a great deal of pride in taking on difficult jobs and his presence in the laboratory will be genuinely missed by all who knew him, colleagues said.

“Keith’s technical expertise, professionalism and commitment to patient care set a uniquely high standard that will continue to serve as an inspiration to everyone who has had the pleasure to work with him,” said staff cytopathologist Dr. Mark Roth. “He is truly among the best, with a distinctive blend of humor, joy and efficiency that will be deeply missed and that is unlikely to be replicated.”

Brosky and his wife, Kathleen, who is also retiring at this time from the NRC, will stay in the area for the next year or so, but plan to move to Pennsylvania or Delaware and downsize in the future.

There will also be lots of traveling, with a trip to Italy already scheduled for next year. Brosky will also catch up on some reading, make a few home improvements and potentially foster cats.

Hodes Receives Lifetime Achievement Award

NIA director Dr. Richard Hodes (c) was recently honored with the President’s Council on Fitness, Sports & Nutrition’s 2016 Lifetime Achievement Award. He was one of five recipients of this year’s award, which recognizes individuals whose careers have greatly contributed to the advancement or promotion of physical activity, fitness, sports and nutrition-related programs nationwide. The award was presented recently by Dr. Wanda Jones (l), senior advisor, offices of the assistant secretary for preparedness and response and assistant secretary for health at HHS, and JoHannah Torkelson (r), Oakridge Institute of Science and Education fellow at the President’s Council.
NIA director Dr. Richard Hodes (c) was recently honored with the President’s Council on Fitness, Sports & Nutrition’s 2016 Lifetime Achievement Award. He was one of five recipients of this year’s award, which recognizes individuals whose careers have greatly contributed to the advancement or promotion of physical activity, fitness, sports and nutrition-related programs nationwide. The award was presented recently by Dr. Wanda Jones (l), senior advisor, offices of the assistant secretary for preparedness and response and assistant secretary for health at HHS, and JoHannah Torkelson (r), Oakridge Institute of Science and Education fellow at the President’s Council.

PHOTO: STEPHANIE NATOLI

Myotonic Dystrophy Briefing Features Katz

NIAMS director Dr. Stephen Katz (c) joins fellow speakers on Capitol Hill—Maj. Mark Sullivan (l) and David Gillies.
NIAMS director Dr. Stephen Katz (c) joins fellow speakers on Capitol Hill—Maj. Mark Sullivan (l) and David Gillies.

PHOTO: COLLEEN DUNDAS

NIAMS director Dr. Stephen Katz recently presented on Capitol Hill at the invitation of the Myotonic Dystrophy Foundation. Myotonic dystrophy is a genetic muscle disorder that affects many parts of the body and currently has no cure. Katz joined fellow speakers David Gillies of the Senate appropriations committee and Maj. Mark Sullivan (U.S. Air Force, ret.) in discussing the importance of research and collaboration to improve myotonic dystrophy understanding and patient care. Katz gave an overview of current myotonic dystrophy-related research funded by NIH and described recent advances made in explaining this condition. Gillies summarized the Department of Defense’s Congressionally Directed Medical Research Program, its history, contributions and current outlook. Finally, Sullivan gave a compelling personal account of his stepbrother’s experience living with myotonic dystrophy while serving in the military.

NIAMSís Gourley Mourned

After living with kidney cancer for 4½ years, Dr. Mark F. Gourley, former director of the NIAMS Rheumatology Fellowship and Training Branch, died on Sept. 17. He was 58 years old.

Dr. Mark F. Gourley
Dr. Mark F. Gourley

“Mark faced adversity with bravery, humility and kindness, continuing to be a great teacher even as he dealt with his own illness,” said NIAMS clinical director Dr. Richard Siegel. “He will be greatly missed by the many physicians, nurses, researchers, patients and friends whose lives he touched and enlightened with his wit and wisdom.”

When Gourley was still a student at Tulane University Medical School in New Orleans, he had his first experience at NIH, completing a 9-week immunology rotation. In 1988, after finishing his residency at the University of Washington, he returned to the Bethesda campus as an NIAMS rheumatology fellow.

Dr. Lisa Rider, who trained with Gourley at NIAMS, said, “Mark was a very warm, personable and caring person who always took time to smile and to help everyone—patients and colleagues at every level. He is remembered as an outstanding rheumatologist, a true expert in the clinical care of lupus and myositis and he was beloved by his patients, fellows and colleagues.”

At NIAMS, Gourley began his career as a lupus researcher, eventually conducting the landmark study that established cyclophosphamide as the standard of care in the treatment of lupus nephritis.

In 1996, he left NIH to establish Washington, D.C.’s first lupus clinic at the Washington Hospital Center. He returned to NIH 6 years later as a clinical investigator at NIEHS, where he focused on environmental causes of autoimmune diseases.

Dr. Fred Miller worked with Gourley at NIEHS and throughout his NIH career. “While his clinical and scientific skills are justly celebrated, we will always remember his kind humor, dedication to patient care, generous training of young clinicians and intellectual stimulation of his colleagues,” said Miller.

In 2007, Gourley was recruited back to NIAMS—the institute he would call home—to direct the NIH Rheumatology Fellowship Program and to oversee clinical care at the NIAMS Community Health Center.

Dr. Adam Schiffenbauer, a fellow who trained under Gourley, said, “Mark was always able to get the best out of people. He knew the right way to get someone to excel and was always willing to go well past an extra mile to help others shine.”

In addition to his training role, Gourley continued to contribute to clinical research in myositis and other areas until his retirement in 2013. Dr. Paul Plotz, who worked with Gourley on muscle disease and myositis research, remarked, “He was a superb physician—always anxious to pass on any new knowledge to his colleagues and students and to draw out of students and fellows what they knew.”

Gourley is survived by his wife, Wendy Kisch; children and sons-in-law, Charlie Gourley, Justin Gourley, Lindsey and Tim Miller, and Jamie and Justin Dean; granddaughter, Elise Dean; mother, Phyllis Gourley; and sister and brothers, Carol Stadler, Paul Gourley and Glenn Gourley.


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