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January 13, 2017
Briefs
Huberman To Give NEI Audacious Goals Seminar, Jan. 24

Dr. Andrew D. Huberman

Dr. Andrew D. Huberman will present “Visual restoration: bridges and gaps to curing blindness in humans,” part of the National Eye Institute Audacious Goals Initiative (AGI) Seminar Series in Neuroregeneration, Tuesday, Jan. 24 at 3 p.m. in Lipsett Amphitheater, Bldg. 10.

Huberman is an associate professor at Stanford University School of Medicine, departments of neurobiology and ophthalmology, and a faculty member of Bio-X, Stanford’s interdisciplinary biosciences program. His seminar will summarize strategies for neuroregeneration of the visual system, reveal what scientists have learned by studying organisms with robust regenerative capacity and describe how medicine is applying this knowledge to some day reverse vision loss in humans.

The NEI AGI Seminar Series in Neuroregeneration explores topics relevant to regenerative neuroscience and medicine, with special emphasis on the visual system. For more information about the series, visit https://nei.nih.gov/audacious/.

Use Social Media Wisely, Responsibly

Social media can be a great way of sharing your opinions and life events with friends and family. The opportunity to find, share and comment on information, data and imagery is unprecedented. But it is important to recognize that the use of social media can also present certain risks.

One of the best things you can do to safeguard yourself, as well as NIH, is to add a disclaimer to all of your social media accounts. Examples can include simple statements such as “All views/posts are my own” as part of your account’s personal/biography section. This is the same location where it is permissible to identify your affiliation with NIH. But be aware that a violation of policy could occur if the NIH name or logo is prominently featured. Also, remember the “rule of 3.” In identifying yourself as from NIH, it should be with at least two other “facts” in your profile.

In the same spirit, do not use your .gov address to identify yourself on social media sites. Use a personal email account to avoid giving the appearance of the federal footprint or any inference of government policy or opinion.

For further guidance, visit https://www.nih.gov/guidance-private-account-social-media-use-individuals-nih.

Collins Receives FASEB Award

The Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology will present its 2017 Public Service Award to NIH director Dr. Francis Collins for his outstanding accomplishments in the communication of science.

“Francis Collins is a model of scientific citizenship,” said Dr. Hudson Freeze, FASEB president. “His passion for public education has been an inspiration and his leadership has motivated thousands of scientists to join him in public outreach. His tireless efforts have earned him our admiration and gratitude.”

Collins’ public outreach has included appearances on the Colbert Report, The Charlie Rose Show, CNN, CNBC, National Public Radio and many other programs, FASEB noted. The group also cited the Director’s Blog and Collins’ communication with thousands of his Twitter followers.

“Whether on camera, in print, online or in song, Francis has the remarkable ability to explain complex scientific concepts to general audiences,” said Freeze. “These extraordinary efforts to underscore the importance of research, combined with his compassion for those in need of new medical interventions, have earned the respect and trust of Americans from all segments of society.”

NINR Video Now Available

Video of the 2016 NINR Science and the Public Lecture “The Most Important Conversation We’re Not Having,” presented by Ellen Goodman, is now available. In her lecture, Goodman describes The Conversation Project, a campaign to change the way people talk about, and prepare for, their end-of-life care. The video is available on NINR’s YouTube channel at https://www.youtube.com/user/NINRnews.

Deer Survey Shows Herd Reaching Healthy Size

Either the deer on the NIH campus are law-abiding users of crosswalks, or they crossed here by accident. Regardless, their numbers are managed in order to prevent malnutrition.
Either the deer on the NIH campus are law-abiding users of crosswalks, or they crossed here by accident. Regardless, their numbers are managed in order to prevent malnutrition.

Many of us enjoy the presence of white-tailed deer roaming the grounds of the main campus, promoting a bucolic perspective in an otherwise urban landscape. Yet, in 2014, the deer population in our densely developed, enclosed campus was reaching a point that jeopardized their health and well-being, particularly due to nutritional deprivation. The herd had reached 45 deer on a 322-acre campus with a “livable square footage” able to sustain a herd of up to 26.

With no hunting permitted, no known predators, relocation outlawed and the increased threat of accidents and other human safety concerns rising during mating season, NIH decided to implement a long-term deer management program that included a humane, non-lethal stabilization of the population through anesthetization and spaying of adult females, as recommended by deer population control experts.

The deer management program is now in its third of 4 years. On the first weekend in December, a group of NIH volunteer veterinarians—the NIH wildlife veterinary volunteers—with the help of wildlife biologist consultants, conducted their annual deer survey on the Bethesda campus.

For the 2016 count, NIH has reached a healthy herd size with 24 deer—3 adult males, 1 male fawn, 1 untagged female fawn and 19 tagged females. In 2015, 29 deer were counted. With each year, NIH has approached a more favorable deer density, starting with 90 per square mile in 2014 to approximately half that density in 2016.

As a reminder, if you notice an injured or distressed wild animal on campus, call (301) 496-5685 or dial 311 from an NIH phone and an on-call veterinarian will be contacted to assist.

NINR Launches ‘Stories of Discovery’ Web Feature

NINR has launched a new web feature that highlights nursing science. The Stories of Discovery web page puts a spotlight on programs of research from NINR-funded institutions around the country. The discoveries deal with areas including self-management, symptom science and end-of-life care.

“From enhancing self-management of conditions like asthma and HIV, to helping seniors receive continuity of care, these stories are examples of how nursing science is paving the way to improve patient outcomes,” said NINR director Dr. Patricia Grady.

NINR plans to add more stories as additional discoveries are made. The stories join other features that highlight NINR-funded research including Because of Nursing Research and Notable Advances. The new feature may be found at https://www.ninr.nih.gov/stories-of-discovery.

NIDA, NIAAA Support Surgeon General’s Report

NIDA and NIAAA directors Dr. Nora Volkow and Dr. George Koob, along with several other public health officials, participated in the recent launch of surgeon general Dr. Vivek Murthy’s new report on alcohol and drug misuse. Facing Addiction in America: The Surgeon General’s Report on Alcohol, Drugs and Health was unveiled at an event held at the Paramount Theater in Los Angeles. The report provides an in-depth look at the science of addiction, calls for a cultural shift in the way Americans talk about the issue and recommends actions to prevent and treat substance use disorders. On hand were (from l) Dr. Jinhee J. Lee, Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA); Dr. A. Thomas McClellan, Treatment Research Institute; Koob; Dr. Keith Humphreys, Stanford University; Volkow; Murthy; Kana Enomoto, SAMHSA; Dr. Constance Weisner, Kaiser Permanente; Dr. H. Westley Clark, Santa Clara University; and Dr. Jorielle Brown Houston, SAMHSA.
NIDA and NIAAA directors Dr. Nora Volkow and Dr. George Koob, along with several other public health officials, participated in the recent launch of surgeon general Dr. Vivek Murthy’s new report on alcohol and drug misuse. Facing Addiction in America: The Surgeon General’s Report on Alcohol, Drugs and Health was unveiled at an event held at the Paramount Theater in Los Angeles. The report provides an in-depth look at the science of addiction, calls for a cultural shift in the way Americans talk about the issue and recommends actions to prevent and treat substance use disorders. On hand were (from l) Dr. Jinhee J. Lee, Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA); Dr. A. Thomas McClellan, Treatment Research Institute; Koob; Dr. Keith Humphreys, Stanford University; Volkow; Murthy; Kana Enomoto, SAMHSA; Dr. Constance Weisner, Kaiser Permanente; Dr. H. Westley Clark, Santa Clara University; and Dr. Jorielle Brown Houston, SAMHSA.

‘Quilts for Kids’ Donated to Inn

Nearly 50 quilts were presented to the Children’s Inn at NIH on Dec. 15 as part of “100 Quilts for Kids,” an annual charity drive run by the Washington, D.C. Modern Quilt Guild. The yearly effort, conducted from Sept. 1 to Dec. 1, encourages guild members to make a quilt and donate it to a child in need. Shown on her way to deliver the year’s haul is 2016 quilt drive chair Alyson Olander of the NIH Online Information Branch in the OD Office of Communications and Public Liaison. Founded in 2010, the guild has grown to approximately 85 members who gather monthly for sew-ins and tutorials at various locations in D.C., Maryland and Virginia. Nearly 50 quilts were presented to the Children’s Inn at NIH on Dec. 15 as part of “100 Quilts for Kids,” an annual charity drive run by the Washington, D.C. Modern Quilt Guild. The yearly effort, conducted from Sept. 1 to Dec. 1, encourages guild members to make a quilt and donate it to a child in need. Shown on her way to deliver the year’s haul is 2016 quilt drive chair Alyson Olander of the NIH Online Information Branch in the OD Office of Communications and Public Liaison. Founded in 2010, the guild has grown to approximately 85 members who gather monthly for sew-ins and tutorials at various locations in D.C., Maryland and Virginia.







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