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March 24, 2017
Briefs

NINR To Hold Symptom Science Research Symposium

On Apr. 25, the National Institute of Nursing Research will convene a scientific symposium—Symptom Science Research: A Path to Precision Health—highlighting the NINR Intramural Research Program’s scientific advances and collaborations across NIH and other organizations. The symposium will take place in Masur Auditorium, Bldg. 10, from 8 a.m. to 2:30 p.m.

The NINR Intramural Research Program is dedicated to conducting basic and clinical research on the biological, genetic and behavioral mechanisms underlying symptoms of chronic conditions. The ultimate scientific goal is to enhance patient outcomes for individuals with conditions such as digestive disorders, cancer-related fatigue and traumatic brain injury.

The symposium will include scientific panels on: The Role of the Gut-Liver-Brain Axis on Inflammation, Addiction and Infection; The Role of Inflammatory and Glutamatergic Pathways on Fatigue; and Identifying Biomarkers to Improve Clinical Care of Patients with Brain Injury.

There will also be a poster session to highlight research conducted by NINR intramural fellows and trainees along with collaborating scientists from the NIH community and other Institutions.

For more information and to register for the event, visit https://www.ninr.nih.gov/newsandinformation/events/symptom-science-event.

Webinar on Mixed Methods in Disease Prevention, Health Promotion

The latest Medicine: Mind the Gap webinar will explore how quantitative research methods have the most power to appeal to collaborators in funding and policy, while qualitative studies can enhance the validity or trustworthiness of inferences and assertions by providing mutual confirmation of findings.

It will be held Monday, Mar. 27 from noon to 1 p.m. and registration is required. Speaker is Dr. Leonard A. Jason, professor of psychology at DePaul University and director of the Center for Community Research.

Jason is a former president of the division of community psychology of the American Psychological Association. He has served as vice president of the International Association for Chronic Fatigue Syndrome/Myalgic Encephalomyelitis and as chair of the research subcommittee of the U.S. chronic fatigue syndrome advisory committee.

Jason will accept questions before and during his presentation via email at prevention@mail.nih.gov and on Twitter with #NIHMtG. Register for the webinar at https://nih.webex.com/nih/onstage/g.php?MTID=e13cfa0afb1a68cfd13887e2462f27beb.

NIH’s D.C. Presence Deemed Historic

In January, a small cluster of buildings at Observatory Hill in Foggy Bottom were added to the National Park Service’s Historic Register through the efforts of former employees of the Office of Strategic Services (OSS), which later became the Central Intelligence Agency. What does this have to do with NIH? The buildings were constructed for and first occupied by NIH—which this year marks its 130th anniversary—before it moved to its current Bethesda campus.

Recently added to the National Park Service’s Historic Register were buildings in Washington, D.C., that originally housed NIH, but later became headquarters for a spy agency.
Recently added to the National Park Service’s Historic Register were buildings in Washington, D.C., that originally housed NIH, but later became headquarters for a spy agency.

In 1901, when NIH was still the Hygienic Laboratory, Congress authorized construction at the 25th and E Street site of a new building. Responsibility for studying and tracking infectious diseases had just been given to the Hygienic Laboratory—there would be no CDC for decades. The next year, the regulation and licensing of commercially produced serums and vaccines also became the Hygienic Laboratory’s responsibility (now FDA’s). In 1919, another building was added to the site. In 1930, the Hygienic Laboratory became the National Institute of Health—singular—with the responsibility for anything to do with disease, and more buildings were added to the Observatory Hill site.

But there was a limit to the site’s capacity. With its increased duties, personnel and animals, NIH needed more room and cutting-edge laboratories. Luke and Helen Wilson donated land in Bethesda in the mid-1930s for a campus for NIH, and most of the laboratories had moved to Bethesda by 1939. The campus was formally dedicated by President Franklin Roosevelt on Oct. 31, 1940.

The story of how NIH moved to Bethesda can be found in 70 Acres of Science at https://history.nih.gov/research/downloads/70acresofscience.pdf.

During World War II, the buildings that NIH left behind at 25th and E Streets NW were turned over to the OSS, which was created in 1942. Perhaps William “Wild Bill” Donovan, head of OSS, and his staff were a little nervous about occupying buildings associated with medical research. But it is fortunate that their colleagues saved these historically important buildings for posterity.—Michele Lyons

NIAMS Hosts Fellows for Symposium
NIAMS recently hosted a symposium in conjunction with the American College of Rheumatology-European League Against Rheumatism Exchange Program. The program promotes the international exchange of clinical and research skills, expertise and knowledge within rheumatology. It recognizes outstanding health professionals in both laboratory- and clinic-based research and provides exposure to the work being done by colleagues overseas. The all-day event, organized by NIAMS clinical director and program host Dr. Richard Siegel (standing, seventh from l), featured research presentations from exchange fellows as well as NIAMS faculty and Scholars in Translational Research. The meeting also offered networking opportunities for NIH staff and exchange program participants. Keynote sessions by Dr. Daniel Kastner (standing, l), NHGRI scientific director, and Dr. Constantino Pitzalis (not shown), program host at Queen Mary University of London, highlighted the day.
NIAMS recently hosted a symposium in conjunction with the American College of Rheumatology-European League Against Rheumatism Exchange Program. The program promotes the international exchange of clinical and research skills, expertise and knowledge within rheumatology. It recognizes outstanding health professionals in both laboratory- and clinic-based research and provides exposure to the work being done by colleagues overseas. The all-day event, organized by NIAMS clinical director and program host Dr. Richard Siegel (standing, seventh from l), featured research presentations from exchange fellows as well as NIAMS faculty and Scholars in Translational Research. The meeting also offered networking opportunities for NIH staff and exchange program participants. Keynote sessions by Dr. Daniel Kastner (standing, l), NHGRI scientific director, and Dr. Constantino Pitzalis (not shown), program host at Queen Mary University of London, highlighted the day.

PHOTO: REAYA REUSS

1ST IN NEW SERIES
ULT Freezer Show Scheduled for Apr. 26

The NIH Division of Scientific Equipment and Instrumentation Services will host NIH DSEIS Presents: The ULT Freezer Show from 10 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. on Wednesday, Apr. 26 in the Bldg. 10 south lobby.

Intramural principal investigators, lab managers and other interested researchers are invited to inspect ultra low temperature (ULT) freezers that meet new energy-efficient requirements. (See https://nems.nih.gov/programs/Pages/NIH-Ultra-Low-Temperature-Freezer-Policy.aspx for details.)

DSEIS staff will also be on hand to answer questions about options for obtaining and maintaining ULT freezers and other scientific equipment.

According to Tammie Edwards, DSEIS acting director, “This event is just one way DSEIS is fulfilling its mission to help members of the NIH intramural community acquire and maintain scientific equipment and laboratory instrumentation.”

The ULT Freezer Show is the first in the NIH DSEIS Presents series of on-campus events for the intramural research community. Each event will feature a different type of equipment or instrumentation so that intramural researchers can get “up close and personal” with the tools they need to conduct their important work.

For more information about DSEIS, visit http://dseis.od.nih.gov.

For equipment sales and rental, contact Anju Vergheese at (301) 496-9748 or email rental@ors. od.nih.gov. For equipment maintenance, repairs and fabrication, contact Jerry Tyus, (301) 496-4131 or email DSEIS_repairs@nih.gov.

‘PROMOTING RESILIENCE’
Gewirtz Gives Next Lecture in NCCIH Series

The National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health will present the next talk in its Integrative Medicine Research Lecture Series, “Promoting Resilience in Military Families: After Deployment, Adaptive Parenting Tools,” by Dr. Abigail Gewirtz on Monday, Mar. 27 at 10 a.m. in Lipsett Amphitheater, Bldg. 10. In addition, at 2 p.m., Gewirtz will be available via a Facebook Live Q&A session, www.facebook.com/nih.nccih/.

The After Deployment, Adaptive Parenting Tools (ADAPT) program is the first of its kind focused on post-deployment parenting practices in military families. Developed in response to the effects of a parent’s deployment on children, the ADAPT program incorporates emotion socialization techniques including yoga, mindfulness meditation and emotion coaching.

Gewirtz will share the rationale for incorporating mindfulness approaches into a parenting program, walk through the goals and content of the ADAPT program’s different formats and discuss two NIH-funded randomized trials evaluating program outcomes.

Gewirtz is director of the Institute for Translational Research in Children’s Mental Health and the John and Nancy Lindahl leadership professor in the department of family social science and Institute of Child Development at the University of Minnesota.

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