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June 30, 2017
Milestones

NCI Mourns Former Communications Staffer Anderson

Linda Frances Anderson, NCI alumna
Linda Frances Anderson, NCI alumna

Linda Frances Anderson, 67, formerly a member of the communications staff at the National Cancer Institute, died on June 11 at her home in Lake Charles, La., following a lengthy illness.

She was born in Houston and had relocated to Louisiana in October 2016. She had resided in the Washington, D.C., area since 1967, calling Kensington her home for the last 25 years.

Anderson graduated from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill with a bachelor’s degree in journalism and earned her master’s in public administration from Georgetown University. She worked for the federal government for more than 30 years, most recently in the NCI communications office and continuing after retirement as a private contractor.

She was a member of several informal beach and bridge clubs, played on USTA-ranked teams (later officiating) and was a long-time member of the Ski Club of Washington D.C. and Same Time Next Year Club. She was an avid supporter of the Shakespeare Theatre, the National Symphony Orchestra, the White House Christmas decorating group, Hillwood Estate & Museum and Brookside Botanical Gardens.

She is survived by siblings Sharon Anderson of Bryan, Tex.; Robin Conrad of Moss Bluff, La.; Janet Anderson of League City, Tex.; and James R. Anderson of Sugarland, Tex.; and by two nephews and five grandnieces. She is also survived by her husband Frank Wilson of St. Mary’s, Ga.; stepdaughters Elizabeth Reichbart of New Jersey and Kate Wilson of North Carolina and six grandchildren.

Anderson was laid to rest in Lake Charles, alongside her parents. Memorial donations can be sent to Hillwood Estate & Museum, 4155 Linnean Avenue, NW, Washington, D.C. 20008.

CC Program Assistant Frazier Dies

Rhea Moore Frazier
Rhea Moore Frazier

Rhea Moore Frazier, program assistant in the Office of Clinical Research Training and Medical Education (OCRTME), passed away on May 30 at the age of 69.

Frazier joined OCRTME in 2009 and provided essential administrative and program support services to allow OCRTME to fulfill its mission within the Clinical Center. She was also responsible for communicating with medical students, physicians, researchers and administrators within NIH, and with extramural organizations, institutions of higher education and training partners on behalf of OCRTME.

Frazier will be greatly missed by her colleagues; she will be remembered for her contributions to the professional development of her team and the next generation of clinician-scientists.

Grantee Deisseroth Awarded Fresenius Prize

Germany’s Else Kroner-Fresenius Foundation awarded the 2017 Fresenius Research Prize to Stanford University professor and Howard Hughes Medical Institute investigator Dr. Karl Deisseroth (l). He accepted the award at a ceremony on May 31 in Berlin. It recognized his achievements in optogenetics, hydrogel-tissue chemistry and research in depression. The Fresenius Research Prize is awarded every 4 years and is the world’s largest monetary award—4 million euros— to a single researcher for scientific achievement. Deisseroth has been an NIH grantee since 2005, when he was selected for an NIH Director’s Pioneer Award. He is shown here with NIBIB director Dr. Roderic Pettigrew following the 2016 Hector Lopez Memorial Lecture.
 
 

Germany’s Else Kroner-Fresenius Foundation awarded the 2017 Fresenius Research Prize to Stanford University professor and Howard Hughes Medical Institute investigator Dr. Karl Deisseroth (l). He accepted the award at a ceremony on May 31 in Berlin. It recognized his achievements in optogenetics, hydrogel-tissue chemistry and research in depression. The Fresenius Research Prize is awarded every 4 years and is the world’s largest monetary award—4 million euros— to a single researcher for scientific achievement. Deisseroth has been an NIH grantee since 2005, when he was selected for an NIH Director’s Pioneer Award. He is shown here with NIBIB director Dr. Roderic Pettigrew following the 2016 Hector Lopez Memorial Lecture.

PHOTO: KATE EGAN

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