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June 30, 2017
NIH Hosts 4th Workshop with Gates Foundation

For the fourth consecutive year, the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation teamed with NIH for a consultative global health workshop. On June 2, researchers from the foundation, NIH and other federal agencies, academia and the public sector gathered for a full day of panel discussions on several topics including vaccine research and development on human papillomavirus prevention and therapy and structure-based immunogen design, point-of-care diagnostics for low-resource settings and the emergence of a coalition for African research and innovation.

From left, Gates, NIH director Dr. Francis Collins, NIAID director Dr. Anthony Fauci and FIC director Dr. Roger Glass listen in on presentations at the recent global health workshop.
From left, Bill Gates, NIH director Dr. Francis Collins, NIAID director Dr. Anthony Fauci and FIC director Dr. Roger Glass listen in on presentations at the recent global health workshop.

Foundation cochair and trustee Bill Gates, NIH director Dr. Francis Collins, NIAID director Dr. Anthony Fauci, Fogarty International Center director Dr. Roger Glass and NIBIB director Dr. Roderic Pettigrew were among officials on hand for the session.

While here, the world renowned IT pioneer and philanthropist Gates got to sample a bit of tech wizardry used at the Vaccine Research Center. Gates donned virtual reality goggles for a demonstration of how scientists explore the molecular structures of influenza in 3-D. A handheld molecule—produced via 3-D printing technology—was also passed around.

The day ended with working group/breakout sessions on such subjects as HIV/AIDS; malaria and neglected tropical diseases; tuberculosis; maternal, neonatal and child health; pneumonia, enteric diseases and indoor air pollution; and contraceptive research.

Vaccine Research Center deputy director Dr. Barney Graham (r) shows Bill Gates a molecule model produced using NIH’s 3-D print technology. In the center photo, wearing virtual reality goggles, Gates explores key immunologic epitopes of an influenza H1 hemagglutinin molecule, used to target next generation influenza vaccines, color coded to show the binding footprints of a set of broadly neutralizing antibodies (yellow), as well as several glycosylation sites (red). On his left is Dr. Phil Cruz, a structural biologist in NIAID’s Office of Cyberinfrastructure and Computational Biology, who collaborated with the translational sciences core in the Viral Pathogenesis Laboratory to adapt molecular structures for 3-D printing and VR visualization.
Above left, Vaccine Research Center deputy director Dr. Barney Graham (r) shows Gates a molecule model produced using NIH’s 3-D print technology. In the photo at right, wearing virtual reality goggles, Gates explores key immunologic epitopes of an influenza H1 hemagglutinin molecule, used to target next generation influenza vaccines, color coded to show the binding footprints of a set of broadly neutralizing antibodies (yellow), as well as several glycosylation sites (red). On his left is Dr. Phil Cruz, a structural biologist in NIAID’s Office of Cyberinfrastructure and Computational Biology, who collaborated with the translational sciences core in the Viral Pathogenesis Laboratory to adapt molecular structures for 3-D printing and VR visualization.

Shown with Gates are (from l) Collins, Fauci and VRC scientists Dr. Mario Roederer, Dr. John Mascola, Dr. Rick Koup, Dr. Michelle Crank, Dr. Nancy Sullivan, Graham, and Dr. Marybeth Daucher
ABOVE: Shown with Gates are (from l) Collins, Fauci and VRC scientists Dr. Mario Roederer, Dr. John Mascola, Dr. Rick Koup, Dr. Michelle Crank, Dr. Nancy Sullivan, Graham, and Dr. Marybeth Daucher.

Gates talks with VR team member James Tyrwhitt-Drake (l), scientific visualization specialist in the NIAID Office of Cyberinfrastructure and Computational Biology, who put molecules into the VR software. At right, NIBIB director Dr. Roderic Pettigrew, who moderated a panel session on point-of-care diagnostics for low-resource settings, chats with Gates.
Above left, Gates talks with VR team member James Tyrwhitt-Drake (l), scientific visualization specialist in the NIAID Office of Cyberinfrastructure and Computational Biology, who put molecules into the VR software. At right, NIBIB director Dr. Roderic Pettigrew, who moderated a panel session on point-of-care diagnostics for low-resource settings, chats with Gates.

PHOTOS: LISA HELFERT

 

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