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November 17, 2017
Briefs

Open Enrollment for NIH Leave Bank

Fall open enrollment for the NIH Leave Bank runs until Dec. 11. The membership period will begin on Jan. 7, 2018.

The Leave Bank is a pooled bank of donated annual and restored leave available to eligible members. It acts like insurance for your paycheck and amounts to paid leave for members who have exhausted all of their own sick and annual leave and are affected by a personal or family medical condition.

The Leave Bank differs from the Voluntary Leave Transfer Program (VLTP) in that the bank is a depository of leave; leave is distributed to members who are approved to be leave recipients. The VLTP, on the other hand, requires a direct donation from donor to recipient. An advantage of the Leave Bank is that eligible members may receive leave to cover time out of the office without awaiting donations from coworkers.

To become a Leave Bank member, access the Integrated Time and Attendance System (ITAS) during open enrollment and enroll under “Leave Bank Membership.” If you are a 2017 Leave Bank member, your membership will automatically continue into 2018, unless you opt out. The yearly membership contribution is one pay period’s worth of annual leave accrual. The membership contribution will automatically be waived if you lack sufficient leave.

For more information visit http://hr.nih.gov/leavebank or contact (301) 443-8393 or LeaveBank@od.nih.gov.

Gail Receives ASA’s Karl Peace Award

Dr. Mitchell H. Gail, senior investigator in the Biostatistics Branch of NCI’s Division of Cancer Epidemiology & Genetics, received the 2017 Karl E. Peace Award for Outstanding Statistical Contributions for the Betterment of Society from the American Statistical Association at the recent Joint Statistical Meetings in Baltimore.

Dr. Mitchell H. Gail

The award recognizes Gail’s seminal contributions to the development of statistical methodology and their application to epidemiology and clinical medicine, particularly risk prediction, HIV incidence estimation, genetic epidemiology and the design, execution and analysis of cancer treatment and prevention trials. Notable is his work to develop the landmark Breast Cancer Risk Assessment Tool, also known as the Gail Model, which is widely used in counseling women on their risk of breast cancer.

In addition, Gail’s contributions have been recognized with his election to the National Academy of 2017Medicine and the Marvin Zelen Leadership Award in Statistical Science. He is also an ASA fellow.

In August—with coauthor Dr. Ruth Pfeiffer, also a senior investigator in the Biostatistics Branch—Gail published a new book as part of the Monographs on Statistics and Applied Probability Series by CRC Press. Absolute Risk: Methods and Applications in Clinical Management and Public Health draws on the investigators’ expertise and seminal achievements in modeling absolute risk.

Established in 2012, the Peace award is given yearly to a statistical scientist who has made seminal contributions with important societal impact.

NIBIB Mobile App Explains Scans

Dr. Mitchell H. Gail

Understanding Medical Scans is a free app for mobile devices that offers helpful explanations of common medical imaging procedures. Developed by the National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering, the new tool’s goal is to explain to patients what to expect during a medical scan and how each type of scan can help with both diagnosis and treatment.

Five types of medical scans are described in the app: positron emission tomography (PET), computerized tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), ultrasound and x-ray imaging. The app uses question-based navigation, images and videos to highlight each of these state-of-the-art technologies. An additional topic within the app is the role of imaging in biomedical research. Developed with the layperson in mind, it may be helpful for patients and family members in formulating questions about pending procedures.

The app can be downloaded onto an Apple or Android device, making medical imaging information easily available anywhere. Visit https://www.nibib.nih.gov/ or search Understanding Medical Scans at the Apple store or on Google Play to download the app.

NIH Community College Day, Nov. 21

NIH Community College Day will take place on Tuesday, Nov. 21 from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. at Natcher Conference Center. To register and for more information visit www.training.nih.gov. The event will provide community college students and faculty an opportunity to visit campus and learn about careers and training opportunities in biomedical and health care fields.

Three NIH’ers Elected to NAM

Dr. Christine Grady
Dr. Christine Grady

Three NIH scientists are among 80 new members elected to the National Academy of Medicine. Election is considered one of the highest honors in the fields of health and medicine and recognizes individuals who have demonstrated outstanding professional achievement and commitment to service.

Dr. George Koob
Dr. George Koob

Dr. Christine Grady is chief of the department of bioethics at the Clinical Center. Dr. George Koob is director of the National Institute on Alcoholism and Alcohol Abuse. Dr. John Mascola is director of the Vaccine Research Center.

“These newly elected members represent the most exceptional scholars and leaders in science, medicine and health in the U.S. and around the globe,” said NAM president Dr. Victor Dzau. “Their expertise will help our organization address today’s most pressing health challenges and inform the future of health and health care to benefit us all.”

Dr. Christine Grady
Dr. John Mascola

New members are elected by current members through a process that recognizes individuals who have made major contributions to the advancement of the medical sciences, health care and public health.

Established originally as the Institute of Medicine in 1970 by the National Academy of Sciences, NAM addresses critical issues in health, science, medicine and related policy and inspires positive actions across sectors.



NICHD’s Basser Honored

Dr. Peter Basser (l), senior investigator who heads the section on quantitative imaging and tissue sciences at the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, accepted the Victor M. Haughton Award for his groundbreaking work on diffusion tensor imaging at the October annual meeting of the American Society of Functional Neuroradiology in Portland, Ore. Congratulating Basser is society president Dr. Christopher G. Filippi.

Dr. Peter Basser (l), senior investigator who heads the section on quantitative imaging and tissue sciences at the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, accepted the Victor M. Haughton Award for his groundbreaking work on diffusion tensor imaging at the October annual meeting of the American Society of Functional Neuroradiology in Portland, Ore. Congratulating Basser is society president Dr. Christopher G. Filippi.

 

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