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January 12, 2018
Briefs

NIDCR Symposium Explores ‘Autotherapies’ on Jan. 25

On Thursday, Jan. 25, the National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research will convene a scientific symposium “Autotherapies: Enhancing Our Innate Healing Capacity” in Lipsett Amphitheater, Bldg. 10 from 8 a.m. to noon.

Advancing the development of autotherapies is one of the five goals of NIDCR 2030, a vision for the future of dental, oral and craniofacial research. Autotherapies are treatments based on the body’s natural ability to heal and protect itself.

For example, immunotherapy harnesses the body’s immune cells to fight cancer and is now in clinical use. In the dental, oral and craniofacial region, autotherapies could be used to selectively signal the body to repair and regenerate tissue, trigger immune responses and restore a natural microbial balance. These strategies might also help to heal damaged or diseased tissues in other parts of the body, prevent or treat infections, fight cancer, treat autoimmune conditions and enhance overall health.

In opening remarks, NIH principal deputy director Dr. Lawrence Tabak will provide an overview of the topic and goals of the event. The symposium will feature four presentations from experts in stem cell biology, craniofacial anomalies and regeneration, regenerative bioengineering and cancer immunotherapy.

The symposium is free and open to the public; no registration is required. The lecture will be videocast live and archived. Sign language interpretation is available upon request. Individuals who need accommodation should contact Mary Daum at Mary.Daum@nih.gov or (301) 594-7559.

NIDA Teleconference Discusses Teen Drug Use Survey Results

The National Institute on Drug Abuse hosted a press teleconference Dec. 14 to discuss the findings of the 43rd annual Monitoring the Future (MTF) survey.

This year’s MTF survey of drug use and attitudes among American 8th, 10th and 12th graders in schools nationwide continues to provide encouraging news with self-reported use of alcohol, cigarettes and many illicit drugs remaining at historically low levels.

However, the survey also found that both vaping and marijuana are more popular than cigarettes.

And what teens say is in the vaping device varies from nicotine, marijuana or “just flavoring.” The survey also shows continuing decreases in the perceived harms of many drugs, including marijuana.

The MTF survey, funded by NIDA, is conducted by researchers at the University of Michigan.

For more on the survey visit https://www.drugabuse.gov/related-topics/trends-statistics/monitoring-future.

Chorus Makes 35th Annual Caroling Visit to CC Patients

On Dec. 24, more than 40 members of the Gay Men’s Chorus of Washington, D.C. brought holiday cheer to Clinical Center patients. This year marked their 35th year of caroling. They first started coming to lift the spirits of patients on HIV/AIDS protocols in 1982. This year, the chorus visited 9 units in the hospital.
On Dec. 24, more than 40 members of the Gay Men’s Chorus of Washington, D.C. brought holiday cheer to Clinical Center patients. This year marked their 35th year of caroling. They first started coming to lift the spirits of patients on HIV/AIDS protocols in 1982. This year, the chorus visited 9 units in the hospital.

Santa, Local Celebs Add Cheer to Children’s Inn Season


Santa and Mrs. Claus
Santa and Mrs. Claus (above) and officers of the Montgomery County Police Department (below) visit the Children’s Inn for the Santa Ride event.
officers of the Montgomery County Police Department

The holiday season at the Children’s Inn at NIH was decidedly cheerier with visits by Santa and several local celebrities.

On Dec. 13, about 50 families gathered outside the inn to greet the annual Santa Ride featuring both the main man and Mrs. Claus, escorted by about 30 motorcycle officers from the Montgomery County Police Department who arrived with sirens blaring.

Sans reindeer for the visit, Santa (also known as MCPD Ofcr. Robert Ladany) stepped off a Harley- Davidson, to the delighted cheers of inn residents. Once inside, he and the missus took photos with kids and chatted about holiday wishes as police motorcycle “elves” painted residents’ faces and had their own faces painted.

On Dec. 22, Washington Wizards power forward Markieff Morris temporarily traded the basketball for an icing tube to help make cookies for Santa with inn kids and family members.

That same day, Real Housewives of Potomac reality TV star Karen Huger helped out during Camp INNcredible, a daily 2-hour winter break camp experience filled with fun learning activities for children spending the holidays at the inn.

Real Housewives of Potomac star Karen Huger (l) and Sarah Mi (r), an NIH postbac researcher, join inn residents Fadia Abugattas, 22, and Ryan Aguirre, 5. NBA star Markieff Morris of the Washington Wizards decorates cookies with inn folks on Dec. 22.
At left, Real Housewives of Potomac star Karen Huger (l) and Sarah Mi (r), an NIH postbac researcher, join inn residents Fadia Abugattas, 22, and Ryan Aguirre, 5. At right, NBA star Markieff Morris of the Washington Wizards decorates cookies with inn folks on Dec. 22.

PHOTOS: SONJA LUECKE

NIAMS Hosts D.C. Lupus Consortium Meeting


The lupus clinical research team at the National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases recently hosted its second annual D.C. Lupus Consortium meeting. They welcomed more than 30 participants, including lupus researchers and advocates from the Washington D.C. area, to the Clinical Center. The consortium aims to foster collaborations among lupus researchers in the NIH Intramural Research Program and partners in the regional academic, private practice and patient advocacy communities.
The lupus clinical research team at the National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases recently hosted its second annual D.C. Lupus Consortium meeting. They welcomed more than 30 participants, including lupus researchers and advocates from the Washington D.C. area, to the Clinical Center. The consortium aims to foster collaborations among lupus researchers in the NIH Intramural Research Program and partners in the regional academic, private practice and patient advocacy communities.

PHOTO: COLLEEN DUNDAS

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