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March 9, 2018
Briefs

Bor To Speak on HIV Prevention, Mar. 19

Dr. Jacob Bor

Dr. Jacob Bor, winner of the Office of Disease Prevention’s 2018 Early-Stage Investigator Lecture, will present “The Promise and Pitfalls of HIV Treatment-as-Prevention: Quasi-Experimental Evidence from South Africa” on Monday, Mar. 19 from 3 to 4 p.m. at the Neuroscience Center Bldg., Rm. A1/A2.

Bor is an assistant professor and Peter T. Paul career development professor in the departments of global health and epidemiology at Boston University School of Public Health. His research applies the analytical tools of economics and data science to the study of population health, with a focus on HIV treatment and prevention in southern Africa. Current research interests include chronic disease management in low-resource settings; economic spillover effects of HIV treatment; decision-making in HIV-endemic risk environments; population health impacts of social policy; and causal inference in public health research. His work has been published in Science, The Lancet, PLOS Medicine, Epidemiology and Health Affairs.

The ODP Early-Stage Investigator Lecture recognizes early-career prevention scientists who have not yet competed successfully for a substantial NIH-supported research project, but who have already made outstanding research contributions to their respective fields and are poised to become future leaders in prevention research.

The lecture is free and open to the public; attendees can join either in person or via https://videocast.nih.gov. Registration is not required. For more information, contact Dr. Stephanie George, stephanie.george@nih.gov.

NIMH Launches Twitter Account for Director

The National Institute of Mental Health has launched an official Twitter account—@NIMHDirector—for its director, Dr. Joshua Gordon. As the lead federal agency for research on mental disorders, NIMH established its enterprise Twitter account, @NIMHgov, in May 2009. It surpassed more than a million followers earlier this year.

“I’m hoping to make the most of this opportunity to share exciting new developments in mental health research,” said Gordon. “I understand the impact of social media and I’m eager to join the conversation on Twitter.”

Gordon joined NIMH in September 2016. Through Twitter, he plans to share his vision and priorities.

First Lady Sweetens Valentine’s Day at Inn

First lady Melania Trump chats with Caitlyn Ribas, 12, sister of NICHD patient Annie Ribas of Silver Spring, as she visits with kids at the Children’s Inn at NIH on Valentine’s Day. At left is inn CEO Jennie Lucca and looking on is NIH director Dr. Francis Collins.
First lady Melania Trump chats with Caitlyn Ribas, 12, sister of NICHD patient Annie Ribas of Silver Spring, as she visits with kids at the Children’s Inn at NIH on Valentine’s Day. At left is inn CEO Jennie Lucca and looking on is NIH director Dr. Francis Collins.

PHOTOS: ERNIE BRANSON

First Lady Melania Trump visited youngsters at the Children’s Inn at NIH on Feb. 14, decorating cookies and exchanging Valentine’s Day cards with them and encouraging them in their fight against rare or critical illnesses.

Inn CEO Jennie Lucca and NIH director Dr. Francis Collins provided Trump with a tour of the inn and participated in activities alongside her.

The first lady embraces Alexis “Lexi” Bingham, 8, of Montrose, Calif. She is an NINDS patient being treated for myopathy.
The first lady embraces Alexis “Lexi” Bingham, 8, of Montrose, Calif. She is an NINDS patient being treated for myopathy.

“It was fun making cookies and meeting and talking to the first lady,” said Amber Negrete, 8, of California, who is staying at the inn while receiving gene therapy at the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke for giant axonal neuropathy, a rare genetic disorder that progressively affects nerve functioning, much like ALS. “I was excited because she said to me, ‘You’re gorgeous,’ and I asked her how it feels to be first lady, and she said ‘good.’”

“This was very fun,” added Saffron Wolley, 16, of London, England, who is being treated for a rare disorder at the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development. “The first lady was so positive. She is very tall and glamorous. I gave her my valentine. She said it’s very lovely.”

At the end of the first lady’s visit, inn resident Lucy Wiese, 9, of Midlothian, Va., and Lucca presented Trump with a special gift created by the children for the Trump family, including a finger-painted heart with a Valentine’s Day message, a FLOTUS apron with the inn logo, Valentine’s Day T-shirts for the first family and inn mugs labeled FLOTUS and POTUS.

“I made a couple of Valentine’s Day cards for her, and she asked me where I live and how old I am,” said Wiese, who underwent a successful bone marrow transplant for a rare immunodeficiency.

“She was really nice,” said Annie Ribas, 9, of Maryland, who was successfully treated for Cushing syndrome at NICHD. “She would ask questions about why people were staying here, and we wished each other a happy Valentine’s Day.”

New Text Campaign from NINR, MedlinePlus

Campaing Ad

The National Institute of Nursing Research and the National Library of Medicine’s MedlinePlus have teamed up to offer a text message service for those living with serious illnesses and their families. The campaign launched on Feb. 5 and offers weekly text messages about palliative care in English and Spanish.

Palliative care’s primary purpose is to relieve the pain and other symptoms associated with serious illnesses and improve quality of life. The text messages provide information about what palliative care is, the benefits of palliative care and resources on how to manage the symptoms of a serious illness. Messages address both adult and pediatric patients and their families.

To sign up for the text messages, text MP CARE to 468311 for English messages or MP CUIDAR to 468311 for Spanish messages.

Visit https://medlineplus.gov/palliativecaretexts.html for more details.

 

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