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March 23, 2018
Briefs

Bike to Work Day, May 18

The NIH Bicycle Commuter Club and the Division of Amenities and Transportation Services invite you to celebrate Bike to Work Day on Friday, May 18. Join your friends and colleagues as we celebrate bicycling as an environmentally friendly, fun and healthy alternative to driving.

Beginning in March, participants can register for free at www.biketoworkmetrodc.org. As the event approaches, DATS will send reminders to the NIH community with updates and NIH-affiliated pit stops. But remember to enter your employer as “National Institutes of Health.”

This will help us defend our title as the employer with the most participants. Additionally, anyone who registers gets a free 2018 Bike to Work Day T-shirt (available while supplies last).

Robust Azalea Leads Off Campus Spring

Azalea Leads Off Campus Spring

This azalea, shown in full bloom on Feb. 28, was among the first harbingers of spring on the NIH campus, along with daffodils and crocuses. Located on the hillside between Bldgs. 31 and 15K, it is an “early blooming deciduous azalea—that is, an azalea that loses its leaves in the winter,” explained Brandon Hartz, NIH landscape architect in the Office of Research Facilities. “These deciduous types are far less commonly planted than the evergreen types that are everywhere. There are at least 20 different species of deciduous azalea and they are commonly hybridized when nursery-grown, so [the photo above] is likely a hybrid of two different species to get the best traits of both. It is a lavender flowering deciduous azalea, which is even less common since most deciduous azaleas have warmer flower tones like white, yellow or orange. Azaleas are in the rhododendron genus as well,” cautioned Hartz, “so like rhododendrons, they are prone to deer damage.”

Holy Comic-Con at the Inn, Batman!

Members of the 501st Legion pose for a photo with Isabel (l) and Lina Kerr, joined by their parents Tara and Gordon
Members of the 501st Legion pose for a photo with Isabel (l) and Lina Kerr, joined by their parents Tara and Gordon. At middle, inn residents Manuel (l) and Christina Adedeji pose with Batman. At right, Lidia Rosas, the inn’s family program coordinator, smiles with the superhero.

The Children’s Inn at NIH hosted Comic-Con, a celebration of comic books, on Feb. 28. Inn residents and their families met some of their favorite comic book characters, created superhero-themed art projects and watched a live musical performance of video game music. Superheroes from the Foundation 4 Heroes and Star Wars characters from the 501st Legion (a Star Wars costuming organization) mingled with residents and their families and posed for photos. The Leidos Scoop ice cream truck stopped by to provide sweet treats—even caped crusaders get hungry. The Washington Metropolitan Gamer Symphony Orchestra capped off the event with a performance of music from popular video games. The orchestra is conducted by Nigel Horne of NLM’s Information Resources Branch.

inn residents Manuel (l) and Christina Adedeji pose with Batman. Lidia Rosas, the inn’s family program coordinator, smiles with the superhero.
The Kerr sisters pose with heroes from Foundation 4 Heroes.
The Kerr sisters pose with heroes from Foundation 4 Heroes.

PHOTOS: P. JENNIFER FORESTER

 

Become Your Healthiest Self

Would you like to learn simple ways to prevent disease and improve your relationships, emotional well-being, physical health and surroundings?

Check out NIH’s Your Healthiest Self: Wellness Toolkits (https://www.nih.gov/health-information/your-healthiest-self-wellness-toolkits) for science-based health tips in five different areas. Each area has checklists of tips you can print for yourself or share with others. The wellness toolkits also link to dozens of NIH resources, fact sheets and articles for more information. The project was assembled by NIH’s Office of Communications and Public Liaison, OD.

For example, find out how to limit your exposure to harmful substances in your home. Get advice for managing stress and adapting to change. Or learn how friends and family can help you gain better health habits.

Good health means more than preventing and treating disease. It also means striving for well-being in all areas of your life. Small changes can add up fast. Find ways to start becoming your healthiest self.

 

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