YOU CAN CHANGE THE WORLD
To Maintain Public Trust, Manage Conflict, Counsels DeAngelis

Dr. Catherine DeAngelis says conflict, and its management, are inevitable physician realities.
Dr. Catherine DeAngelis says conflict, and its management, are inevitable physician realities.

Before she could address the need for physicians to negotiate successfully the inevitable challenges of conflict of interest, Dr. Catherine DeAngelis, editor-in-chief emerita of the Journal of the American Medical Association, had to deal with a cultural difficulty.

“I’ve got this laser pointer in my right hand,” she confided at the outset of her Clinical Center 2018 Distinguished Clinical Research Scholar and Educator in Residence Lecture on Feb. 14, “and in my left hand is this thing that advances the slides. But I’m Italian, so how am I supposed to talk?”

DeAngelis, who is also university distinguished (“not extinguished”) service professor emerita of pediatrics at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine and Public Health, spoke on “Conflict of Interest in Medicine: Facts and Friction.”

Trust lies at the heart of what it means to be a medical professional, she said. It holds the entire patient-caregiver enterprise intact.

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THE FAULTS IN OUR GENES
What Organ Formation, Function Tell Us About Overcoming Mutations

Dr. Didier Stainier
Dr. Didier Stainier

Why do some mutations lead to disease while others seemingly overcome injury without harm? How do some cells pinch hit for their missing or hurt comrades?

With new imaging and editing tools, scientists can see intra-cell behavior firsthand like never before and can potentially mimic the beneficial cell actions (and limit the misdeeds) to improve the lives of people with genetic conditions.

That’s according to Dr. Didier Stainier, director of the department of developmental genetics of the Max Planck Institute for Heart and Lung Research at W.G. Kerckhoff Institute in Germany. He gave a talk, “Genetic Compensation and Transcriptional Adaptation,” for NCI’s Center for Cancer Research Grand Rounds recently in Lipsett Amphitheater.

A longtime NIH grantee, Stainier is a “world renowned expert in elucidating mechanisms that govern organ development”— specifically heart, pancreas and liver, said Dr. Kandice Tanner, Stadtman investigator and chief of the tissue morphodynamics unit in NCI’s Laboratory of Cell Biology, who introduced the speaker.

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