BETTER SUITED FOR BOATS
Bike Day 2018 Celebrates Sans Sun

NIH director Dr. Francis Collins bicycles onto campus for a rainy Bike to Work Day 2018.
NIH director Dr. Francis Collins bicycles onto campus for a rainy Bike to Work Day 2018.

Not even gray skies and steady showers could dim the devotion or slow the wheels of NIH cyclists on Bike to Work Day 2018. Leading off the celebration at a little after 8 a.m. on May 18 was staunch BTWD supporter and NIH pedaler-in-chief himself.

“I look forward to this event every year,” said NIH director Dr. Francis Collins, who estimated 2018 was his 8th or 9th time cycling onto campus for the event. “I always like to mix and mingle with those who are brave enough to get on bikes every day regardless of the weather.”

May is National Bike Month. In 1956, the League of American Bicyclists began Bike to Work Day to promote 2-wheeled commuting and reduce traffic and pollution. In the DMV region, the Metropolitan Washington Council of Governments (COG) convenes a committee each year consisting of representatives from Commuter Connections, a transportation organization, and the Washington Area Bicyclist Association to plan the event.

Collins said he had a special reason for participating this year.

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Breast Cancer Treatments Tailored to Individuals

Dr. Nancy Davidson
Dr. Nancy Davidson

Advances in precision medicine are informing oncologists how best to treat patients with early-stage breast cancer, said Dr. Nancy Davidson at a recent Contemporary Clinical Medicine: Great Teachers Grand Rounds lecture in Lipsett Amphitheater.

The approach involves tailoring therapy to the characteristics of the patient and his or her tumor cells, said Davidson, president of the Seattle Cancer Care Alliance, senior vice president of Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center and professor of medicine at the University of Washington.

“The incidence of breast cancer is considerably higher in African-American and white women than it is in Hispanics and Pacific Islanders in this country,” she said.

There has been a decrease in mortality from breast cancer thanks to early diagnoses and advances in treatment including surgery, radiation and systemic therapies, she noted.

“The disease is largely one—although not exclusively—of older women,” Davidson explained. “The mortality from breast cancer goes up over time and is highest in older women.”

Traditionally, she said, health care professionals have determined the stage of breast cancer by measuring the size of a tumor, how many lymph nodes are involved and whether or not the cancer has spread to other parts of the body.

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