CURRENT ISSUE - April 19, 2019

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NIAID director Dr. Anthony Fauci

Fauci Discusses Public Misperceptions About Viruses

Emerging from the height of cold and flu season, it may seem as though there are dozens of new, increasingly stubborn viruses out there. This, in fact, is not the case.

“There is not this whole hoard of...Read more

Dr. Oliver Gaycken

NLM Relaunches Vintage Movies with Overview Lecture

From virtual travel and art imagery to family planning and the sexual revolution...Read more

Dr. Felicia Knaul

Access to Palliative Care, Pain Relief Out of Reach for World’s Poor

The world’s poorest citizens have almost no access to the...Read more

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ON THE COVER:

Campus beauty. In the courtyard of the Clinical Research Center, an anemone gets its closeup.
ON THE COVER: Humans typically have two sex chromosomes—X (larger pair) and Y. Scientists have evidence that millions of years ago, X and Y were the same size and contained essentially the same genes. Now, virtually the only DNA they still have in common is at the very tips (blue).

IMAGE: MELISSA WILSON, ARIZONA STATE UNIVERSITY

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Vice President Bush Visits Clinical Center, Gets AIDS Update From Experts

NIH Director James Wyngaarden (I) reviews the history of AIDS research for Vice President George B..^h „. „
Vice President George Bush paid a surprise call on the Clinical Center Apr. 8, spending an hour and a half learning about AIDS from physicians and patients and fielding questions from a large media turnout.

"This has been a fantastic educational experience," said Bush after touring NCI labs and being briefed by members of NIH's AIDS Executive Committee. "You're doing the Lord's work to fight this disease."

NIH Marks Women's History Month

Ann Timmons, a communication artist, performed a one-woman play about equal rights pioneer Charlotte Perkins Gilman.

"Critical Thinking." That's how women at NIH change America, according to organizers of the 2005 Women's History Month celebration, who adapted the occasion's national theme "Women Change America" for the NIH audience.

Leading off the celebration, sponsored by NIH's Office of Equal Opportunity and Diversity Management on Mar. 9, Ann Timmons, a communication artist, performed the one-woman play, Off the Wall: The Life and Works of Charlotte Perkins Gilman. Author in 1892 of The Yellow Wallpaper, a semi-autobiographical account of a woman's struggle with depression, Gilman was a pundit and lecturer on equal rights for women.



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Contact us Editor: Rich McManus
Associate Editor: Carla Garnett
Phone: (301) 496-2125
Humans typically have two sex chromosomes—X (larger pair) and Y. Scientists have evidence that millions of years ago, X and Y were the same size and contained essentially the same genes. Now, virtually the only DNA they still have in common is at the very tips (blue).