CURRENT ISSUE - May 19, 2017

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Al Pittampalli addresses NIH audience.

Beware the Intruder Hijacking Your Meetings

Ever wonder why so many meetings are so unproductive? Chances are good an uninvited guest has been riding shotgun. Turns out this unseen hitchhiker loves to sabotage your well-organized, well-intentioned workplace gatherings...Read more

Dr. Linda Buck

Buck’s Research Helps Unravel Mysteries of Scent

The sense of smell is extremely important in everyday life. It can, for example, warn us of danger or alert us to the presence...Read more

Dr. Amy Wagers

Wagers Tracks Aging in Muscle Cells

You don’t need to be a gym rat to know that muscle matters; without it, we wither toward our own personal finish line...Read more

DEPARTMENTS

ON THE COVER:

A scanning electron microscope picture of a nerve ending broken open to reveal vesicles (orange and blue) containing chemicals to pass messages in the nervous system.
ON THE COVER: Adult Caenorhabditis elegans, 5 days old. C. elegans has become one of the most studied organisms on the planet. Researchers have determined that C. elegans has exactly 959 cells, 302 of which are neurons.

IMAGE: COLLEEN MURPHY, PRINCETON UNIVERSITY

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NIH Hosts Two Congressional Visits, Feb. 3

Sen. Richard Durbin, flanked by his health legislative assistant Binta Beard (l) and legislative director Dena Morris, confers with NIH leaders. They include (from l) NINDS director Dr. Story Landis, NHLBI director Dr. Gary Gibbons, NIH director Dr. Francis Collins and NCI director Dr. Harold Varmus. Gibbons is explaining current research in the area of heart disease. Sen. Richard Durbin, flanked by his health legislative assistant Binta Beard (l) and legislative director Dena Morris, confers with NIH leaders. They include (from l) NINDS director Dr. Story Landis, NHLBI director Dr. Gary Gibbons, NIH director Dr. Francis Collins and NCI director Dr. Harold Varmus. Gibbons is explaining current research in the area of heart disease.

Kevles Discusses Issues Involving ‘Patenting Life’

Dr. Daniel Kevles signs copies of his books during NIH visit.

Masur Auditorium was transformed into one of the city's largest law school classrooms on Apr. 17 when Dr. Daniel Kevles, a Cal Tech professor of humanities and author who is soon to join the history faculty at Yale University, gave the second History of Genetics lecture, cosponsored by the DeWitt Stetten Jr. Museum of Medical Research at NIH and NHGRI.



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Adult Caenorhabditis elegans, 5 days old. C. elegans has become one of the most studied organisms on the planet. Researchers have determined that C. elegans has exactly 959 cells, 302 of which are neurons.