CURRENT ISSUE - May 17, 2019

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Dr. Thomas Bulea presents at CC Grand Rounds.

Can Exoskeletons Help Kids with CP Walk Better?

For more than a decade now, since 2008 when Marvel Studio’s Iron Man debuted, pop culture fans have been fascinated by the idea of people donning robot parts to be stronger or faster. Medicine and technology teaming up to enhance...Read more

Dr. Husseini Manji

Manji Develops Novel Treatment for Major Depressive Disorder

Major depressive disorder is a debilitating, chronic disease that afflicts more than 300 million people worldwide...Read more

Dr. Farr Curlin

Curlin Presents Alternative View of Patient-Clinician Dialogue

As the Clinical Center buzzes with everyday activity, there sometimes comes that snag clinicians face while informing...Read more

DEPARTMENTS

ON THE COVER:

Campus beauty. In the courtyard of the Clinical Research Center, an anemone gets its closeup.
ON THE COVER: Stem cells engineered to grow cartilage. A scaffold was shaped over a mold, attached to mesh and seeded with stem cells. After 38 days in culture, the stem cells had grown to create a smooth, glistening surface. This process may lead to treatments for hip osteoarthritis that avoid the need for extensive hip replacement surgery.

IMAGE: GUILAK LAB, WASHINGTON UNIVERSITY WITH FUNDING FROM NIAMS

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Blue Ribbon Panel Urges Changes in NIH Conflict Policies

NIH director Dr. Elias Zerhouni (r) makes a point as deputy director Dr. Raynard Kington (c) and Dr. C. Martin Harris look on.
Like a tailor crafting a garment for a customer of unusual dimensions, the blue ribbon panel on conflict of interest policies drafted a custom-made set of 18 recommendations and presented it May 6 to NIH director Dr. Elias Zerhouni and the 88th meeting of the advisory committee to the NIH director (ACD). The new suit — a little looser in the middle, a little tighter at the top

NIH Marks Women's History Month

Ann Timmons, a communication artist, performed a one-woman play about equal rights pioneer Charlotte Perkins Gilman.

"Critical Thinking." That's how women at NIH change America, according to organizers of the 2005 Women's History Month celebration, who adapted the occasion's national theme — "Women Change America" — for the NIH audience.

Leading off the celebration, sponsored by NIH's Office of Equal Opportunity and Diversity Management on Mar. 9, Ann Timmons, a communication artist, performed the one-woman play, Off the Wall: The Life and Works of Charlotte Perkins Gilman. Author in 1892 of The Yellow Wallpaper, a semi-autobiographical account of a woman's struggle with depression, Gilman was a pundit and lecturer on equal rights for women.



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Contact us Editor: Rich McManus
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Phone: (301) 496-2125
Stem cells engineered to grow cartilage. A scaffold was shaped over a mold, attached to mesh and seeded with stem cells. After 38 days in culture, the stem cells had grown to create a smooth, glistening surface. This process may lead to treatments for hip osteoarthritis that avoid the need for extensive hip replacement surgery.