EARTH DAY, TOO
NIH Observes Take Your Child to Work Day

NIH principal deputy director Dr. Lawrence Tabak hosts Picture Puzzle Trivia, a Bldg. 1 event that explored health science facts.
NIH principal deputy director Dr. Lawrence Tabak hosts Picture Puzzle Trivia, a Bldg. 1 event that explored health science facts.

Where can you tour a pathology lab, learn how to draw blood, visit live birds and reptiles and observe smoking’s effects on the respiratory system? Oh, and drag adults toward the candy shop and knock on office doors then run, too?

Only at NIH’s 24th Take Your Child to Work Day/Earth Day, of course!

This year, more than 4,100 students participated in over 190 activities on Apr. 26. They learned about vital services their parents and guardians provide at NIH, explored career opportunities in medical research and had fun while doing it.

Around 9:30 a.m., a small group of students, their parents and guardians gathered outside the NCI Autopsy Suite in the Clinical Center. Future engineers, nurses, surgeons and lawyers donned their medical scrubs, were warned not to touch anything unless they wore gloves and told, “If you don’t feel well, let me know.” The students listened intently as they learned there’s more to pathology than what’s portrayed on forensics crime drama television shows.

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Heen Discusses Art of Receiving Feedback Well

Sheila Heen
Sheila Heen

A little gratitude would be nice. Instead, the draft you meticulously labored over comes back fully revised and your face turns redder than the ink on the page. It can be tough receiving negative feedback, but is some of it perhaps valuable?

“Every single day, we swim in an ocean of feedback,” said Sheila Heen during a recent interactive and witty Deputy Director for Management seminar in Masur Auditorium.

“It’s our relationship with the world—how we’re impacting other people—and the world’s relationship with us.”

There’s often no shortage of feedback from bosses, colleagues, teachers, family and friends. It’s usually direct. Sometimes it’s unspoken and plenty of it is unsolicited. Other times, we want more specific feedback and aren’t sure how to request it.

“Receiving feedback is actually a distinct and critical leadership skill,” said Heen, bestselling author, Harvard Law School lecturer and founder and CEO of Triad Consulting Group. “If you get better at it, you can actually learn even from the poor givers in your life.”

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