NIH Holds Annual Corps Promotion Ceremony

Dressed in their white uniforms, recently promoted NIH Commissioned Corps officers pose with the surgeon general.

Surgeon General Jerome Adams (c), Radm. Richard Childs (l) and Radm. Peter Kilmarx (second from l) join NIH Commissioned Corps officers who were promoted this year.

Photo: Jeff Elkins

Children pose on stage with Surgeon General Jerome Adams

Adams invited children in attendance to the stage for a photo.

Photo: Jeff Elkins

NIH’s Public Health Service Commissioned Corps held its annual promotion ceremony in Masur Auditorium recently.  

The ceremony began with the presentation of colors by the U.S. Surgeon General’s Color Guard, the National Anthem and the Public Health Service march. Rev. Ellen Swinford provided the invocation and benediction. Radm. Richard Childs, assistant U.S. surgeon general and NHLBI clinical director, introduced special guests including Surgeon General Jerome Adams and NIH associate deputy director Dr. Tara Schwetz, who gave keynote remarks. 

Ten of the NIH Commissioned Corps officers who were promoted this year participated in the ceremony. Categories, ranks and promotees are:

Medical officers, promoted to commander—Jane Baumblatt, Ian Myles; nurse officers, promoted to captain—Megan Mackey; promoted to commander—Tat’Yana Worthy; promoted to lieutenant commander—Frances Andrada, Patrycja Hoffmann, Melanie Webb; environmental health officers, promoted to captain, Jason Barr; promoted to commander, Matthew Deptola; dietician officer, promoted to captain, Merel Kozlosky.

Promotees had provided remarks in advance on what it means to them to be an officer. Childs read the sentiments as each officer reported on stage. Attention to orders were read and family members, friends and colleagues changed shoulder boards to reflect officers’ new ranks. 

Adams congratulated the promoted officers and invited children in attendance to the stage for a photo. The ceremony ended with recognition of newly retired officers and new calls to active duty. —Theresa Yu