NSO Presents ‘Sound Health’ Concert at NIH

Reineke addresses the crowd

Steven Reineke, the NSO’s principal pops conductor, addresses the crowd before the concert.

Photo: Chia-Chi Charlie Chang

Carole Bean plays the piccolo

Carole Bean and her piccolo were featured in selections from Antonio Vivaldi.

Photo: Chia-Chi Charlie Chang

Matthew Guilford plays the bass trombone

Bass trombone player Matthew Guilford was the soloist in Eric Ewazen’s Andante con moto from Concerto for Bass Trombone.

Photo: Chia-Chi Charlie Chang

Glenn Garlick plays the cello

Cellist Glenn Garlick (l) is familiar at NIH as a mainstay of the Manchester String Quartet.

Photo: Chia-Chi Charlie Chang

Nurit Bar-Josef plays the violin

Violinist and NSO concertmaster Nurit Bar-Josef.

Photo: Chia-Chi Charlie Chang

The full orchestra

The full orchestra drew a large, appreciative audience.

Photo: Chia-Chi Charlie Chang

The National Symphony Orchestra presented “A Sound Health Concert” in the atrium of the Clinical Research Center on Sept. 26, thrilling an audience of patients, staff and visitors with nine selections performed under the baton of Steven Reineke, the NSO’s principal pops conductor.

The full orchestra’s visit—and concerts by smaller NSO ensembles—are parts of the Sound Health Initiative, which for the past 7 years has brought world-class music to NIH. Just a week before the concert, NIH announced an award of $20 million over 5 years to support the initiative’s first research projects, which will explore the potential of music for treating a wide range of conditions resulting from neurological or other disorders.

“I look forward to coming out here each year,” said Reineke. “It’s such a pleasure to be back. I have always been fascinated by the healing powers of music.”

The concert, just over an hour long, opened with Mozart and ended with Mendelssohn, but also featured American composers Aaron Copland, Florence Beatrice Price and Eric Ewazen. 

The performance was co-presented by the Foundation for Advanced Education in the Sciences and the Clinical Center.