November 1, 2019

  • A drawing of hand using Freeman’s icepick-inspired transorbital lobotomy instrument on patient

    When Faces Made the Case for Lobotomy

    In the late 1930s to late 1950s, doctors might have tried to cure your mental illness by drilling a hole in your brain. They may have been convinced by eccentric neuroscientist Dr. Walter Freeman, “the world’s greatest proponent and pioneer of lobotomy.”
  • Dr. Rita Charon

    Charon Espouses Power of Narrative Medicine

    Columbia Professor Dr. Rita Charon encourages the medical community to think beyond their checklists of symptoms and embrace patient narratives. Actively listening to and empathizing with patients, she said at the recent Gadlin lecture, can improve health outcomes.
  • NCCIH Celebrates 20th Anniversary

    “I think it’s fair to say that at 20 years old, NCCIH has proven itself to be an incredibly valued and important member of the NIH family,” said NIH director Dr. Francis Collins at the center’s 20th anniversary symposium, “NCCIH at 20: A Catalyst for Integrative Health Research.”
  • Grantees Share 2019 Nobel Prizes

    Four NIH grantees won Nobel Prizes last month, including two who shared the prize for physiology or medicine and two who shared the economics prize.
A researcher inserts a gene chip into a machine.

On the Cover

Biologist James Balow Jr. inserts a GeneChip into the GeneChip fluidics station to analyze RNA from patient samples in order to identify genes that are differently expressed between patients with autoinflammatory diseases and controls.

Photo: Rhoda Baer