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NIH Record  
Vol. LIX, No. 3
  February 9, 2007
 Features
President Bush Visits NIH for Fifth Time
NIDA-Funded Teen Survey Shows Decrease in Illicit Drug Use
NIH Hosts Third Women’s Health Research Symposium
‘We Can!’ Helps Communities, Families Prevent Childhood Obesity
Management Intern Program Recruits
 Departments
Briefs
Milestones
Volunteers
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‘Each One, Teach One’
Power of Mentoring, Inspiring Others Is Stressed at MLK Celebration
  Martin Luther King commemoration keynote speaker Dr. LaSalle Leffall (c) is welcomed to Masur Auditorium by CC director Dr. John Gallin (l) and NIH director Dr. Elias Zerhouni.
  Martin Luther King commemoration keynote speaker Dr. LaSalle Leffall (c) is welcomed to Masur Auditorium by CC director Dr. John Gallin (l) and NIH director Dr. Elias Zerhouni.

If it’s true that great leaders are not born, but made, then a wise course would be to inspire more “makers.” That was the path taken at NIH’s 2007 salute to Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., “Fulfilling the Promise, Living the Dream,” as speaker after speaker emphasized the impact you can have on someone you take under your wing.

“I think about the things that have happened to me and I often say I’ve had more than my share of life’s wonderful bounty,” said keynoter Dr. LaSalle Leffall of Howard University College of Medicine, “but that’s due to the great help I’ve had along the way. I’ve had a tremendous amount of help. Whatever I can do for others is really miniscule compared to what others have done for me. I value the role mentors have played in my life.”
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First, Do No Harm
Cassem Charts Ethical Answers To ‘Inappropriate Surrogates’
  Dr. Ned Cassem of Harvard
  Dr. Ned Cassem of Harvard

Can clinicians contravene a patient’s end-of-life choices and yet stay within ethical bounds? If the patient’s surrogate defies an advance directive, how should staff respond? An Ethics Grand Rounds discussion, “Inappropriate Surrogates: What Should Clinicians Do?” tackled the issue recently in Lipsett Amphitheater.

At age 54, a patient called EB had struggled with congenital heart disease her whole life. Now severely ill with congestive failure, renal shutdown and septic shock, she dictated her advance medical directive to her caregivers: “I want all effective treatments for keeping me alive, no matter what my condition.”
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