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Vol. LXII, No. 17
August 20, 2010
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‘Adventure in Science’ Program Plans 18th Year

Martin Yau (third from l) gets advice from Jacob Yank in a computer programming class.

Above, Martin Yau (third from l) gets advice from Jacob Yank in a computer programming class. Below, Sayak Maity (l) and Prem Khandge peer at the beating heart of a chick embryo.

Sayak Maity (l) and Prem Khandge peer at the beating heart of a chick embryo.

Adventure in Science, a non-profit science education program for children, is planning its 18th year at NIH. The program, which meets on Saturday mornings October through March in Bldg. 10, is designed to show 8- to 11-year-olds the fun of science using hands-on activities, from building and launching model rockets to dissecting frogs. The teachers are mostly volunteers from the NIH staff, from postdocs to institute directors. A similar program for children ages 12 to 15 is available at the National Institute of Standards and Technology in Gaithersburg.

If you are interested in volunteering to teach in the program, contact Peter Kellman (301) 496-2513, kellmanp@nhlbi.nih.gov or Ed Max, (301) 827-1806, edward.max@fda.hhs.gov. If you would like to enroll your child, you can request forms from the 4H office at Montgomery County Cooperative Extension, (301) 590-9638. When the program enrollment is full, applications are accepted for a waiting list.

 

 

 

 

 

Students (from l) Katie Cannon, Naveen Raman, Elliot Kienzle, David Bleecker and Peter Siegel learn how an internal combustion engine works by “dissecting” a lawn mower motor, led by Ted Cannon

At left, students (from l) Katie Cannon, Naveen Raman, Elliot Kienzle, David Bleecker and Peter Siegel learn how an internal combustion engine works by “dissecting” a lawn mower motor, led by Ted Cannon

 

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