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Vol. LXIII, No. 21
October 28, 2011
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Milestones
Former Communications Chief Whaley Mourned
Dr. Robert Marston
Whaley Mourned Storm Whaley, who served as NIH’s top communications official for 22 years before retiring in 1992, died Sept. 18 in San Diego at age 95.

He was recruited to NIH in 1970 by fellow southerner Dr. Robert Marston, who had been named NIH director 2 years earlier. Marston created the position of NIH associate director for communications for Whaley, whom he had met while both men served as deans of medical schools in the south.

Whaley’s deanship exemplified a capacity to undertake fresh challenges and succeed with aplomb. Despite lacking a medical education (he had earned a B.S. in mathematics from John Brown University in his native Arkansas in 1935), Whaley suddenly found himself running the University of Arkansas Medical School when, as acting university president, he was unable to recruit for the post of vice-president for health sciences and ended up taking the job himself. It was that position, which he held for 10 years, that first acquainted him with both NIH and Marston, who ran the University of Mississippi medical school.

Whaley’s gifts became apparent in every milieu he explored. While an undergraduate, he began work at a local radio station and ended up general manager of a media empire during an 18-year career. His news-gathering acumen earned him the respect of Rep. J.W. Trimble of Arkansas, who brought Whaley to Washington in 1953. A year later, Whaley became assistant to the president of the University of Arkansas, and later acting president and medical school dean.

Whaley served under a total of five NIH directors and four acting directors, earning the respect of each with his judgment and skill as a writer, speaker and advisor. A genial, low-key avuncularity belied a keen intelligence. “I’ve always felt comfortable working with people that I recognize as giants,” he said of his NIH career.

Whaley had many interests, including singing in barbershop quartets, solving math problems, piloting airplanes, teaching others to fly and painting. He especially enjoyed painting in the Chinese style; his artworks bore his “chop,” or signature. He also studied Mandarin Chinese.

At Whaley’s retirement send-off in January 1992, then-NIH director Dr. Bernadine Healy took note of his breadth of interests, adding, “Most of all, Storm Whaley knows how to be your friend. He has been of inestimable value to me. I trusted his calm, confident advice and appreciated his clarity of view. He is an absolutely first-rate man and intellect. I’m happy I was able to get to know this extraordinary man who gave so much to NIH.”

In retirement, Whaley and his wife Jane traveled the world. Before moving to San Diego in 2005, he enjoyed putting his broadcast skills to work as a volunteer reader of texts for people who were blind or dyslexic. That work earned him the Super Senior Award in 1999 from Iona Senior Services of Washington, D.C.

Whaley was a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, a member of the Broadcast Pioneers, a lifetime member of the Arkansas Broadcasters Association, a 33rd degree Mason and a member of Omicron Delta Kappa, a national leadership honor society for college administrators.

He is survived by his wife of 75 years, Jane Bucy Whaley, three daughters: Carroll Jean Anderson of San Diego, Ann Marie Whaley of London, England, and Rebecca Glenn Whaley of Little Rock, Ark.; seven grandchildren and three great-grandchildren.

Memorials may be made to the Storm and Jane Whaley scholarship fund at John Brown University, the Butler Center for Arkansas Studies at Little Rock, or Learning Ally (formerly Recording for the Blind and Dyslexic) in Washington, D.C.—Rich McManus

NINR Council Welcomes Three

NINR director Dr. Patricia Grady (third from l) welcomes new council members (from l) Dr. Courtney Lyder, Dr. James Tulsky and Dr. Kenton Kaufman.

NINR director Dr. Patricia Grady (third from l) welcomes new council members (from l) Dr. Courtney Lyder, Dr. James Tulsky and Dr. Kenton Kaufman.

Photo: Ernie Branson

NINR director Dr. Patricia Grady recently welcomed three new members to the National Advisory Council for Nursing Research, the principal advisory board for NINR.

Dr. Kenton Kaufman is professor of biomedical engineering at Mayo Clinic and co-director of the clinic’s biomechanics and motion analysis laboratory. His work is primarily translational and is aimed at improving the diagnosis, treatment and rehabilitation of human musculoskeletal injury and disease.

Dr. Courtney Lyder is dean of the UCLA School of Nursing, professor of nursing, medicine, and public health and executive director of the UCLA Health System and Patient Safety Institute. He is the first African-American dean at UCLA and the first minority male to be dean of a school of nursing in the U.S.

Dr. James Tulsky is director of the Center for Palliative Care and the Center for Self-Management in Life-Limiting Illness and a professor in the schools of medicine and nursing at Duke University. His current research focuses on enhancing the communication between oncologists and patients with advanced cancer.

New NCAB Member Announced

Dr. Tyler E. Jacks

The White House has announced the appointment of one new member to the National Cancer Advisory Board. Dr. Tyler E. Jacks is director, Koch Institute for Integrative Cancer Research, David H. Koch professor of biology at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and an investigator with the Howard Hughes Medical Institute. He has pioneered the use of technology to study cancer-associated genes and to construct animal models of many human cancer types, including cancers of the lung, pancreas, brain and ovaries. He was elected to both the National Academy of Sciences and the Institute of Medicine of the National Academies in 2009.

 

NIH Recognized for Electronics Recycling

On hand for the award presentation were (from l) Howard Kelsey, HHS deputy assistant secretary, Office of Facilities Management and Policy; Kenny Floyd, director of the Division of Environment Protection, ORF; Michael Kessler, Office of Logistics Services; Lt. Beth Osterink, NIH recycling coordinator; Matt Bogoshian, senior policy counsel, Office of Chemical Safety and Pollution Prevention, EPA; and Nikki Buffa, associate director of communities, environmental protection and green jobs, White House Council on Environmental Quality.

NIH was recently recognized with a Bronze Award in the Federal Electronics Challenge (FEC) for leadership in electronics stewardship during fiscal year 2010. The award was NIH’s first-ever in the FEC challenge. The FEC is a partnership program managed by the Environmental Protection Agency that encourages federal facilities and agencies to purchase greener electronic products, reduce the impact of electronic products during use and manage used and obsolete electronics in an environmentally safe way. On hand for the award presentation were (from l) Howard Kelsey, HHS deputy assistant secretary, Office of Facilities Management and Policy; Kenny Floyd, director of the Division of Environment Protection, ORF; Michael Kessler, Office of Logistics Services; Lt. Beth Osterink, NIH recycling coordinator; Matt Bogoshian, senior policy counsel, Office of Chemical Safety and Pollution Prevention, EPA; and Nikki Buffa, associate director of communities, environmental protection and green jobs, White House Council on Environmental Quality.


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