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Vol. LXV, No. 15
July 19, 2013
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NIH News in Health Celebrates 100 Issues

Cover of the NIH News in Health
Keep your body moving, engage your muscles, eat right and maintain a healthy weight. These are among the tips you’ll find in the July 2013 NIH News in Health cover story on biomechanics. The issue, which includes a story on preventing hyperthermia and several “health capsules,” marks the publication’s 100th edition.

NIH News in Health, a publication of the OD Office of Communications and Public Liaison, primarily gets sent to community health clinics, senior centers and libraries. “I think the most interesting thing about News in Health is the diversity of its audience,” said managing editor Harrison Wein. “Community health clinic workers use it as a teaching tool; Meals on Wheels distributes it; health insurance agents send it to their clients; high school teachers and librarians use it as a resource.”

The first issue of the monthly NIH News in Health came out in April 2005, featuring a story on breast cancer. The practical information in each issue is reviewed by NIH’s medical experts and based on research conducted by NIH’s own scientists and grantees.

“We synthesize the work of all the different ICs at NIH,” said editor Vicki Contie. “If we’re doing a story on vegetarian diets, for example, we consult NCI, ODS [Office of Dietary Supplements] and NIDDK. We pull everything together, the best of NIH. And the communications offices are wonderful at finding experts for us to interview, both intramural and extramural.”

Currently, NIH News in Health sends about 24,000 print copies to recipients in all 50 states, all by request. About 140,000 receive the newsletter via email. It’s also available on the web at http://newsinhealth.nih.gov/. The publication has won numerous NIH Plain Language Awards and awards from the National Association of Government Communicators.

“Our goal is to empower people to make healthy choices,” said Wein. “We tell people how to use what we discover at NIH to improve their health.”—Dana Steinberg


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