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NIH Record  
Vol. LXVI, No. 10
  May 9, 2014
 Features
NIH Celebrates a Decade of Brain Disorders Research
Biophysicist Ha Eavesdrops on Single Molecular Conversations
Former NIAID Scientist To Give Chanock Lecture, May 27
Iwasaki To Give Annual Dyer Lecture, May 14
Drew To Deliver NINR Director’s Lecture, May 20 at Natcher Bldg.
Merck Renews Commitment to Woodmont House
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Uncovering Unconscious Bias
Is the ‘Hidden Brain’ Behind Some Health Disparities?

Shankar Vedantam, a science correspondent with National Public Radio, delivers a recent Deputy Director for Management seminar.
Shankar Vedantam, a science correspondent with National Public Radio, delivers a recent Deputy Director for Management seminar.
Turns out, it wasn’t the devil that made you do it. It was your “hidden brain.” That’s what Shankar Vedantam suggested at a recent lecture on unconscious bias at work, part of the 2013-2014 Deputy Director for Management Seminar Series. Vedantam said he “coined the term ‘hidden brain’ to describe mental activities that happen outside our conscious awareness.

“Is it possible,” he wondered, “that some of the [health] disparities we’re seeing are not the result of bad people behaving badly, but of well-intentioned people who are unintentionally doing the wrong thing? Is it possible that unconscious biases of well-intentioned people are responsible for these disparities that we observe?”


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Despite Progress, Challenges Remain in Fight Against HIV/AIDS

The steps that led to AIDS being a treatable disease rather than an automatic death sentence and attempts to identify the best treatments for AIDS were topics at a recent Great Teachers Grand Rounds lecture in Lipsett Amphitheater.

Dr. Henry Masur, chief of the Clinical Center’s critical care medicine department, said scientists have made great progress in the fight against AIDS. Dr. Cliff Lane, NIAID clinical director, cautioned that there is still much to learn about AIDS.

Since the disease was first recognized, scientists have made great advances in AIDS research. In 1984, NCI’s Dr. Robert Gallo developed an AIDS blood test. In 1987, the Food and Drug Administration approved the first AIDS treatment, zidovudine, a drug initially tested in AIDS patients at the CC by Drs. Sam Broder and Robert Yarchoan of NCI. In 1988, scientists concluded that prophylactic antibiotics could prevent Pneumocystis pneumonia.


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