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Vol. LXVI, No. 21
October 10, 2014

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Dr. Ann R. Knebel

Nine Named to Council of Councils

NIAMS Welcomes Five Council Members

Dr. René Etcheberrigaray


Milestones

UCSF Honors NINR Deputy Director

Dr. Ann R. Knebel

Dr. Ann R. Knebel, deputy director of NINR, was recently honored by the University of California, San Francisco School of Nursing with the Jane Norbeck Distinguished Alumni Award. The award recognizes UCSF graduates “who have made significant contributions to the nursing profession and have demonstrated service and/or leadership that contributed to the growth and development of the UCSF School of Nursing and/or the profession.” The award, established in 1984, is named for former School of Nursing dean Jane Norbeck, who was a member of Knebel’s dissertation committee nearly 25 years ago.

Knebel, a retired rear admiral in the Commissioned Corps, has served as deputy director of NINR since 2012. Prior to that, she was deputy director of the Office of Preparedness Planning, HHS. In this role, she applied scientific principles and research expertise to the evolving scientific field of disaster preparedness, leading to the development of handbooks, planning guides and peer-reviewed publications.

Knebel earned her Ph.D. in nursing science at UCSF in 1990. She also has a baccalaureate degree in nursing and a master of nursing science degree from the University of Evansville. The award presenter noted, “Dr. Knebel has lived a life of clinical practice, research and service at the highest levels and exemplifies the ideals of the award.”

Nine Named to Council of Councils

The Division of Program Coordination, Planning and Strategic Initiatives recently welcomed nine new advisory members to the Council of Councils who will advise on DPCPSI policy and programs.The new members are:

Dr. Philip O. Alderson, dean of the School of Medicine, vice president for medical affairs, Saint Louis University, served as a professor of radiology and previously chaired the department of radiology at Columbia University. He has developed imaging technologies that focus on the cardiovascular and central nervous systems.

Dr. Marlene Belfort, distinguished professor of biological sciences in the School of Public Health at the University of Albany, focuses on attracting and nurturing a cluster of accomplished young scientists. Her research interests include genetics, specifically the study of organisms’ hereditary information encoded in DNA and RNA.

Dr. Ana M. Cuervo, professor of the departments of development and molecular biology, medicine and anatomy and structural biology at Albert Einstein College of Medicine, serves as co-director of the Einstein Institute for Aging Research. She is a leader in the field of protein degradation in relation to biology of aging.

Dr. Judy E. Garber, director of the Center for Cancer Genetics and Prevention at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, works as a medical oncologist and clinical cancer geneticist. Her research interests include identifying individuals with genetic factors that place them at high risk of developing cancer and strategies to reduce cancer risk.

Dr. Lila Gierasch is distinguished professor of biochemistry and molecular biology and chemistry at the University of Massachusetts. Her research focuses on protein folding and the cellular machinery that helps maintain folded, functional proteins.

DPCPSI director Dr. James Anderson (c) meets with members of the Council of Councils (back, from l) Drs. Norma Sue Kenyon, Steven DeKosky, Philip Alderson, Marlene Belfort, Terry Magnuson and Norbert Pelc; (front, from l) Drs. Lila Gierasch, Anderson and Ana Marie Cuervo. Not shown are Drs. Judy Garber and King Holmes.
DPCPSI director Dr. James Anderson (c) meets with members of the Council of Councils (back, from l) Drs. Norma Sue Kenyon, Steven DeKosky, Philip Alderson, Marlene Belfort, Terry Magnuson and Norbert Pelc; (front, from l) Drs. Lila Gierasch, Anderson and Ana Marie Cuervo. Not shown are Drs. Judy Garber and King Holmes.

Dr. King K. Holmes, professor and chair of global health and director of the Center for AIDS and STDs at the University of Washington, is a global expert in AIDS and STIs and principal investigator for the International Training and Education Center on Health, one of the world’s largest HIV/AIDS training programs.

Dr. Norma Sue Kenyon is professor of surgery, medicine and biomedical engineering and executive director of the Wallace H. Coulter Center for Translational Research at the University of Miami School of Medicine. She is involved in basic as well as clinical diabetes research including islet cell transplantation as a therapeutic approach for managing diabetes.

Dr. Terry Magnuson, vice dean for research at the University of North Carolina School of Medicine, is director of the new Carolina Center for Genome Sciences. His work focuses on the role of mammalian genes in unique epigenetic phenomena such as genomic imprinting and X-chromosome inactivation.

Dr. Norbert J. Pelc, Boston Scientific applied biomedical engineering professor and chair of bioengineering at Stanford University, is renowned for his work in the field of biomedical imaging. He developed a multidisciplinary pre-doctoral program at Stanford to train the next generation of biomedical imaging
scientists.

NIAMS Welcomes Five Council Members

NIAMS director Dr. Stephen Katz (c) and deputy director Dr. Robert Carter (second from r) welcome new members to the institute’s council. They are (from l) Dr. Christy Sandborg, Dr. Gwendolyn Powell Todd, Dr. Gary Koretzky, Dr. Grace Pavlath and Alexander Silver.
NIAMS director Dr. Stephen Katz (c) and deputy director Dr. Robert Carter (second from r) welcome new members to the institute’s council. They are (from l) Dr. Christy Sandborg, Dr. Gwendolyn Powell Todd, Dr. Gary Koretzky, Dr. Grace Pavlath and Alexander Silver.

NIAMS has appointed five new members to its advisory council. They include:

Dr. Gary A. Koretzky, dean of Weill Cornell Graduate School of Medical Sciences and senior associate dean for research at Weill Cornell Medical College. His research focuses on T cells, a subset of white blood cells involved with fighting infection and destroying cancer cells.

Dr. Grace K. Pavlath, professor in the department of pharmacology at Emory University School of Medicine. Her research centers on the cellular and molecular mechanisms that regulate the function of satellite cells, stem cells found in skeletal muscle that are critical for muscle growth and repair.

Dr. Christy Sandborg, professor of pediatrics in the division of pediatric rheumatology at Stanford University School of Medicine. Her research involves designing new models of care and health care delivery for children with complex chronic illnesses.

Alexander Silver, co-founding partner of P2 Capital Partners LLC in New York City. He also is founder and chair of the Jackson Gabriel Silver Foundation, a non-profit organization dedicated to finding treatments and cures for epidermolysis bullosa, a rare blistering skin disease.

Dr. Gwendolyn Powell Todd, a professional leader, educator and advocate for patients with cicatricial alopecia, a rare disorder in which hair follicles are replaced with scar tissue. She applies leadership, teaching and coaching expertise in business, education, health care and community service environments.

Etcheberrigaray Named CSR Deputy Director

Dr. René Etcheberrigaray

Dr. René Etcheberrigaray is the new deputy director of the Center for Scientific Review. He had been serving as director of CSR’s Division of Neuroscience, Development and Aging.

“René brings to this key position highly valued management skills and a strong commitment to NIH peer review,” said CSR director Dr. Richard Nakamura. “He also shares my vision for peer review and complements my NIH background.”

He noted that Etcheberrigaray has “a great depth of experience with NIH peer review policies and practices and he has a remarkable ability to rapidly master new challenges.” He came to CSR in 2002 to be scientific review officer of the clinical neurosciences and disease study section. In 2005, he was promoted to chief of CSR’s brain disorders and clinical neuroscience integrated review group and was named a division director in 2008.

Etcheberrigaray will help manage the center’s 460 employees, who each year receive more than 80,000 grant applications, recruit about 17,000 reviewers and convene about 1,500 review meetings.

Etcheberrigaray obtained his M.D. from the University of Chile in 1987. He then came to NIH as a Fogarty International Center postdoctoral fellow, studying ion channel physiology and molecular neurobiology in an NINDS intramural lab. He continued there as a visiting associate and then a visiting scientist. Etcheberrigaray later moved to Georgetown University, where he started a laboratory that focused on potential therapeutic targets for Alzheimer’s disease and the role of calcium regulation and amyloid processing in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer’s. Before coming to CSR, he was laboratory director and senior scientist at a biotech company in Rockville.


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