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NIH Record  
Vol. LXVII, No. 3
  January 30, 2015
 Features
Ophthalmologist-Turned-Global-Health-Rock-Star Visits NIH
Nobel Laureate Moerner To Speak, Feb. 5
Chanock Gives 11th Trent Lecture, Feb. 11
Mental Health Is Focus of Initiative by NIH, Delta Sigma Theta
NINR Conducts Inaugural Big Data in Symptoms Research ‘Boot Camp’
Grady Highlights Importance of Evidence-Based Practice
Congressional Staff See ‘Inside NIAMS Labs’
 Departments
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Milestones
Volunteers
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Ebola Patients Pose Unique Challenges to CC Nurses

Nurses who work on the special clinical studies unit include (from l) Leighann Ebenezer, Debbie Gutierrez, Melissa Hubbard, Kevin Barrett, Kim Adao and Kim Jeffries.
Nurses who work on the special clinical studies unit include (from l) Leighann Ebenezer, Debbie Gutierrez, Melissa Hubbard, Kevin Barrett, Kim Adao and Kim Jeffries.

They’re on the job 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. They take vital signs, blood and other samples, refill supplies, serve food, disinfect rooms and take out the trash—all while wearing a head-to-toe protective suit and two pairs of gloves.

They are the nurses who care for patients with Ebola or those who may have been exposed to the disease. They work at the Clinical Center’s special clinical studies unit (SCSU), a modern, high-tech facility that provides high-level isolation capabilities.

Caring for these patients presents a set of unique challenges, said nurse Melissa Hubbard, the unit’s clinical manager.

Anyone who enters the patient’s room must follow strict procedures for putting on—donning—and taking off—doffing—protective equipment that covers the whole body, she said. This equipment includes two pairs of gloves, two pairs of shoe covers, a Tyvek suit, disposable gown and a powered air-purifying respirator.


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The Power to Influence
Grenny Shares Strategies to Change Human Behavior

Author Joseph Grenny
Author Joseph Grenny
It’s frustrating when you ask others to do something and they don’t comply. It can be hard enough to influence ourselves to get things done. The challenge might be how to get your colleague to focus on a team project or how to get your neighbor to mow that overgrown lawn. Whether you’re a department head trying to improve your staff’s compliance with safety procedures or a parent trying to get your kid to do his homework, these are all problems of influence.

We spend our lives trying to answer two basic questions, said bestselling author Joseph Grenny: Why are they doing that and how can I get them to change?



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