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Vol. LXVII, No. 10
May 8, 2015
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NIH Honored for Historic Preservation

Phillip Neuberg (c) accepts an award on behalf of NIH from David Craig (l), Maryland secretary of planning, and Elizabeth Hughes, acting state historic preservation officer.

Phillip Neuberg (c) accepts an award on behalf of NIH from David Craig (l), Maryland secretary of planning, and Elizabeth Hughes, acting state historic preservation officer.

The Maryland Historical Trust recently presented NIH’s Office of Research Facilities with an award for Outstanding Stewardship by a Government Agency at its 2015 Historic Preservation Awards ceremony in Annapolis. Now in its 40th year, the Maryland Preservation Awards recognize outstanding efforts in architecture, archaeology, museum work, cultural conservation, education and related fields.

Phillip Neuberg, NIH federal preservation officer and chief of the Facilities Programming and Planning Branch in ORF’s Division of Facilities Planning, accepted the award on behalf of NIH.

The trust recognized that: “Through its ongoing long-term planning, active capital renewal program and ongoing, sensitive stewardship, the NIH has demonstrated the federal government’s ability to balance the research needs of the institution with the communal and public benefits of historic preservation.” NIH has successfully “taken best practices and made historic preservation an integral part of ongoing campus planning and capital renewal programs. More importantly, perhaps, these efforts point to how the NIH has united historic preservation with the mission of ‘Turning Discovery into Health.’”

The ORF Historic Preservation Program covers a variety of buildings and three historic districts on the Bethesda campus. These include Bldgs. 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8 and the “Quarters” (Bldgs. 15B, C, D, E, F, G, H, I, K), Bldgs. 16 and 16A, Bldgs. 29, 29A and 30 and Bldgs. 38, 38A and Bldg. 60, which was once a convent. These historic properties are highlighted in the NIH Bethesda Master Plan, which is updated about every 5 years. The location, site and character of these historic properties inform the future of campus development.

Neuberg also received, on behalf of NIH, a certificate of special recognition from Sen. Ben Cardin’s office at the event.—Susan Permut


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