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NIH Record  
Vol. LXVII, No. 14
  July 3, 2015
 Features
NIH’ers Take a Hike for Fun, Fitness
Axelrod Symposium Honors Coyle
NCI Staff Help Open Shanghai Proton Heavy Ion Center
 Departments
Briefs
Milestones
Digest
Seen
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‘Intense Phase’
Comings, Goings, Upgrades Mark ACD Meeting

NLM working group cochairs Dr. Eric Green (l) and Dr. Harlan Krumholz of Yale

NLM working group cochairs Dr. Eric Green (l) and Dr. Harlan Krumholz of Yale

Enhanced visions for both the National Library of Medicine and the intramural research program (IRP) marked the 110th meeting of the advisory committee to the NIH director (ACD) June 11-12, along with a welcome to new NINDS director Dr. Walter Koroshetz and a fond farewell to NIH deputy director for extramural research Dr. Sally Rockey, who is leaving in September.

A congressionally mandated strategic plan for NIH, due by December, elicited lively discussion by the ACD and will continue to evolve as a working group decides on the proper taxonomy. And a game plan for the Precision Medicine Initiative announced by President Obama in January continues at a sprint to meet its September deadline; the last two of four national meetings on PMI are being held this month.

“If the history of the ACD is ever written, this will be remembered as a particularly intense phase,” said NIH director Dr. Francis Collins. The committee, which meets twice a year, has in recent years faced “a wide variety of really critical topics,” he said.


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‘Faces of Clinical Research’ Speak at Women’s Health Week Event

Dr. Janine Clayton applauds ORWH’s 25th anniversary.

Dr. Janine Clayton applauds ORWH’s 25th anniversary.

Juliana was tired of spending so much time in the hospital. Sickle cell anemia was increasingly taking over her life. Two different sources suggested the same NIH research study in the same week. It must be a sign, she thought.

Jamie and her family were keeping a very big secret. Every so often, the 10-year-old disappeared from her small town life and went away for medical treatments. What she told people was partly true: she had a heart condition. She didn’t tell them the whole of it: She had contracted HIV through a blood transfusion during surgery and was in a research study at NIH.


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