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February 24, 2017
Briefs

Progress Made on Water Tanks on Campus

The TESS , or thermal energy storage system, will hold 8 million gallons of chilled water and stand 100 feet high; it will help reduce peak power demand on campus.
Anyone familiar with the parade of dump trucks on campus in the past year already knows that much progress has been made on two huge new water tanks on the south side of campus, which comprise the Assure/Expand Chilled Water Capacity project. The TESS (above), or thermal energy storage system, will hold 8 million gallons of chilled water and stand 100 feet high; it will help reduce peak power demand on campus. Below is the IWSS, or industrial water storage system, which will hold 5 million gallons of water. Like the TESS, it is 120 feet in diameter, but only 65 feet high. It will allow NIH to meet the need for water for a few days if a supply interruption occurs. Dirt taken from the massive excavation was used to fill in the site of demolished Bldg. 7, on the east side of Bldg. 10, according to the Office of Research Services. Both tanks are due for completion by this fall.

PHOTOS: BILL BRANSON
the IWSS, or industrial water storage system, which will hold 5 million gallons of water. Like the TESS, it is 120 feet in diameter, but only 65 feet high. It will allow NIH to meet the need for water for a few days if a supply interruption occurs. Dirt taken from the massive excavation was used to fill in the site of demolished Bldg. 7, on the east side of Bldg. 10, according to the Office of Research Services. Both tanks are due for completion by this fall.
the IWSS, or industrial water storage system, which will hold 5 million gallons of water. Like the TESS, it is 120 feet in diameter, but only 65 feet high. It will allow NIH to meet the need for water for a few days if a supply interruption occurs. Dirt taken from the massive excavation was used to fill in the site of demolished Bldg. 7, on the east side of Bldg. 10, according to the Office of Research Services. Both tanks are due for completion by this fall.

Win a 2018 FARE Travel Award

NIH fellows, win a travel award and enhance your CV. Submit an abstract by Mar. 16 to www.training.nih.gov/felcom/fare. The FARE competition provides recognition for outstanding intramural scientific research. Winners receive a $1,000 travel award to present their research at a scientific meeting between Oct. 1, 2017, and Sept. 30, 2018. For more information, contact the FARE 2018 committee at FARE@mail.nih.gov.

Sailing Association Open House, Mar. 8 at FAES House

The NIH Sailing Association invites everyone to its open house on Wednesday, Mar. 8 from 5 to 8 p.m. at the FAES House at the corner of Old Georgetown Rd. and Cedar Ln. Explore your interest in learning to sail and discover opportunities for sailing with NIHSA. There will be information about 6-week basic training classes, the club’s racing program and social activities offered by NIHSA. A fee of $5 at the door includes pizza, drinks and snacks. Cash bar for beer and wine—$2 each. Look for NIHSA posters and flyers around campus. For more information, visit www.nihsail.org/.

Workshop on Work/Life, Well-Being Offered for Supervisors

OHR and ORS continue to offer the free supervisory workshop Work/Life @ NIH: A Supervisor’s Guide to Enhancing Workforce Well-Being in 2017.

This workshop, which was launched in 2016, provides an overview of workforce well-being and how it can benefit your organization; highlights the policies and programs NIH offers to promote workforce well-being; and provides supervisors with strategies to manage various workplace flexibilities. The workshop is led by NIH’s own subject matter experts and has been approved for two Continuous Learning Points for supervisory refresher purposes.

Registration is available now in the Learning Management System. Register by searching for course ID #NIHWRD1003. The first session for 2017 is scheduled for Wednesday, Mar. 1 from 9 to 11:30 a.m. at 6710B Rockledge Dr., Rm. 1425/1427. Announcements for additional sessions will be released at a later date. Questions? Email Courtney Bell, ORS (bellcd@mail.nih.gov) or Kelly Peralta, OHR (peraltakl@nih.gov) for more information.

Circus Night Benefits Charities

Join the NIH R&W at 7 p.m. on Thursday, Mar. 30 as it celebrates the final appearance of the Ringling Bros. and Barnum & Bailey Circus at Verizon Center. For 20 years, R&W has been able to bring joy to patients and families at the Children’s Inn, at-risk youth and others. Purchase your ticket at the R&W stores in Bldg. 31 (1st floor) or Rockledge or call (301) 496-2670. If you know of a group or organization that may be interested in purchasing a large quantity of tickets to the circus, have them contact David Browne at browned2@mail.nih.gov.

MAR. 8
Page To Speak in NLM Lecture Series

Dr. David Page
Dr. David Page

The next topic in the National Library of Medicine Informatics Lecture Series is “High-Throughput Machine Learning from EHR Data,” given by Dr. David Page on Wednesday, Mar. 8 from 2 to 3 p.m. in Lister Hill Center Auditorium, Bldg. 38A.

The widespread use of electronic health records and the many recent successes of machine learning raise at least two questions to be discussed in Page’s talk: How well can future health events of patients be predicted from EHR data, at various lengths of time in advance?

And how can such predictions improve human health? Page is a Vilas distinguished achievement professor at the University of Wisconsin. His primary appointment is in the department of biostatistics and medical informatics in the School of Medicine and Public Health, with another appointment in the department of computer sciences, where he teaches machine learning. He directs the Cancer Informatics Shared Resource of the Carbone Cancer Center and is a member of the Genome Center of Wisconsin.

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